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“When you cease to fear death the rules of war change.”
     -- Shel-la

The narrative of the first season of DS9, and it’s a point I’ve made over and over and will likely continue to make, is the writers trying to understand the kinds of stories they can tell within the format of the show.  Eventually, they’ll learn that DS9 is the great paradox of Trek shows: to work within the format, they have to break that same format, and we’ll end up with some of the most bracing, fascinating, and, yes, dark storytelling the franchise has ever seen.  With this first season, the writers are stumbling around, flirting with various elements that will grow to define the series, and many that will get mercifully abandoned.  To their credit, they recognize when something is working and when something isn’t (Haven’t heard from Primmin lately, have we?), and developing the show in that direction.  This week’s episode, “Battle Lines,” is nearly recognizable as the series I love.

The following is an interview with Stuart Moore (Wolverine Noir, Stargate: Atlantis) and Bruce Zick (Thor, Atomic Legion), the creators of Mandala, the new trade paperback that was recently published by Dark Horse Comics.  In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Moore and Zick about the initial inspiration for the comic book series, the intricacy involved with creating the story's vast sci-fi world, their creative process of working together, and what's next for Mandala!

This interview was conducted on May 17, 2014.

“You think the whole galaxy is plotting around you, don’t you? Paranoia must run in your species, Odo. Maybe that’s why no one has ever seen another shapeshifter. They’re all hiding!”  -- Quark

It’s pretty easy to see why Odo was the first breakout character of the show.  It’s like they took a checklist of all the things guaranteed to connect with an audience and applied it to him.  Loner with a mysterious past? Check. Only one of his kind? Check. Cool powers? Check.  Gruff exterior masking a deep inner pain only curable with the love of a good woman? You better believe that’s a check.  It’s a wonder that more people didn’t grow up nursing an impossible Odo crush or wander around conventions wearing Team Odo shirts.  “Vortex,” the eleventh episode of the first season, once again turns the spotlight on our favorite grouchy ball of amber protoplasm, but instead of focusing solely on Odo’s preoccupation with justice, it tests that against the great unanswered question of his origin.

The following is an interview with Vince Brusio, writer of the new comic book Autopsy: Feast for a Funeral #1, which was made in collaboration with (and fully licensed by) famed death metal band Autopsy.  The band, which was formed in 1987 by Chris Reifert and Eric Cutler and has long been considered a pioneering band in the death metal and Doom/Death genres, has previously ventured into other mediums (with contributions to the 2005 music documentary Metal: A Headbanger's Journey and Hellbent for Cooking: The Heavy Metal Cookbook); however, Feast for a Funeral marks their first foray into comics.  Now, Brusio and Autopsy are joining forces and taking the world by storm, as cast members in this year’s premier episode of Showtime’s Shameless can even be spotted wearing Feast for a Funeral t-shirts.

In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Brusio about the inspiration for the comic book, the creative process of working with Autopsy and artist Mats Engesten, his other upcoming projects, and more!

This interview was conducted on May 13, 2014.

"I've been looking for an original sin
One with a twist and a bit of a spin
And, since I've done all the old ones
‘Till they've all been done in
No, I'm just looking
And, I'm gone with the wind
Endlessly searching for an Original Sin"

So sang Taylor Dayne in the theme to the ill-fated 1994 film adaption of The Shadow starring Alec Baldwin. The movie may have been a flop, but the song still rests comfortably in my iPod.

He's so "Lucky;" he's a star! I can't remember the first time I became aware of my cosplaying friend, Chris Riley. I think at some event here in L.A. It's a little presumptuous to say "friend," as I don't think we've actually met, but he is a kindred spirit nonetheless. With cosplaying at the height of popularity with shows like Heroes of Cosplay and Hollywood mega hits making every Tom, Dick, and Harry want to don a cowl, I thought it would be fun to check in with Chris Riley (a.k.a. Captain Lucky), and the following interview transpired.

“Never trust anyone who places your prosperity above their own.”
     -- Grand Nagus Zek


The Ferengi were originally intended as TNG’s Klingons, the shadowy foil to the shiny, happy Federation.  Introduced with some fanfare in “The Last Outpost,” the cannibalistic monsters of that episode, with their energy whips and Worf-beating prowess, are scarcely recognizable as the cheerfully greedy space capitalists that we know and presumably love.  The Ferengi never worked as a convincing other (even their name, derived from the Arabic faranji, or “foreigner,” states this purpose for the race), but they do function as a fascinating and often hilarious counterpoint to Starfleet.  They’re basically a bunch of hard-charging capitalist hustlers from the go-go ‘80s trying to exist in the middle of a post-scarcity utopian economy.  The stories practically write themselves.

The following is an interview with Leslee Scallon, co-founder (with Michael Trent) of the Los Angeles-based Dances With Films festival, which is celebrating its 17th year and taking place from May 29th through June 8, 2014. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Managing Editor Barbra Dillon chats with Scallon about the mission behind the film festival, this year's motto, the new addition to the festival's Advisory Board, and how both aspiring filmmakers and cinefiles can learn more about this year's event.

This interview was conducted on May 8, 2014.

The following is an interview with Eisner Award-nominated Deron Bennett (letterer of Tale of Sand, Cyborg 009, Thrilling Adventure Hour, Masters of the Universe), writer of the creator-owned comic book series Quixote. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Senior Contributor Jason Enright chats with Bennett about his sci-fi and fantasy take on the age-old Don Quiote tale, the process of working with artist Dan Mora and letterer Paul Little, and the future of the comic book series.

This interview was conducted on May 8, 2014.

The following is an interview with Eryk Donovan, a contributing artist to IDW Publishing's new In the Dark Horror Anthology. In this interview, Fanboy Comics Guest Contributor Morgan Perry chats with Donovan about how he became involved in the anthology, the creative process of working with so many talented creators, and the influences of his own artistic style.

This interview was conducted on May 7, 2014.

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