Kurtis Wiebe, creator of Rat Queens, collaborates with Mindy Lee and Leonardo Olea to bring a space adventure to Dark Horse Comics. Bounty has a futuristic Robin-Hood-in-space kind of thing going on, along with some bright neon colors and one extremely funny robot, giving it an overall fun feel.

Has anyone else noticed that when franchises become too big, the creators only make them…bigger!!!

Well, that’s what’s happening in a specific dimension of New York City, and the timeline I’m referring to contains mutants and teenagers and pizza-loving ninjas.  Oh my!

If you’re interested in finding a comic book that combines humor with the strong will of three college friends, then Giant Days by BOOM! Studios is perfect. The cover, created by Lissa Treiman, tells you exactly what you’re in for when you open up these fun pages. Three friends, Daisy, Esther, and Susan, are lying in the grass with trash and red plastic cups scattered nearby.

Talk about a concept that nobody knew they wanted.  Big Trouble in Little China/Escape from New York #1 crosses over two cult classics by the legendary John Carpenter, both starring Kurt Russell.  The fact that both main characters are played by the same actor is actually a major plot point.  Let’s see if it holds up under it.

In the following interview, Fanbase Press Guest Contributor Erik Amaya interviews Star Wars Rebels Executive Producer Dave Filoni on the new season, working with Tom Baker, and why viewers crave more screen time for Hondo Ohnaka.


If there is one thing that is certain about the animated world of Star Wars in both The Clone Wars and Rebels: there can never be enough of smuggler Hondo Ohnaka.

World War I was a pretty terrifying ordeal: the advent of modern warfare; the war to end all wars. Thousands died each day and that was just in Russia. From that war sprung painter Paul Nash, a British soldier so shaken by the war that it inspired some beautiful and powerfully surreal war imagery. He is quoted as saying, “I am a messenger who will bring back word from the men who are fighting to those who want the war to go on forever. Feeble, inarticulate will be my message, but it will have a bitter truth and may it burn their lousy souls.” Now, approaching WWI’s centenary, David McKean embraces this passion and brings us a graphic novel in honor of Nash’s work.

Collecting volumes two and three of the popular manga and now film, I Am a Hero, by Kengo Hanazawa is one of the most fascinating, weirdly hilarious, and uncommonly human zombie epics in existence. Our “hero” of this story is Hideo Suzuki, a thirty-five-year-old reclusive manga artist who takes medication for hallucinations, illegally owns a personal shotgun (Look up Japan’s gun laws.), and who has yet to reach the popularity he’s struggled for as a creator. In Omnibus One, it almost begins as a slice-of-life character study, and zombies seem like a second thought to Hanazawa. Hideo has a girlfriend who can’t take her liquor and who looks up to another manga artist which causes some jealous friction between the two. Hideo’s co-workers don’t treat him well, while Hideo rants on and on about the true art of manga, and, honestly, the whole book could be this. I would have praised it.

This editorial provides Fanbase Press readers with a retrospective to the original 1973 film Westworld, directed by Michael Crichton, and serves as a kickoff to an ongoing series of reviews discussing each episode of the HBO series, Westworld, premiering this Sunday evening, October 2. Reviews will post each subsequent Friday.


For $1,000 a day, adults can indulge in highly realistic situations in one of three Delos amusement parks: Roman World, Medieval World, and West World. All three worlds are inhabited by androids that are lifelike and have been programmed to fulfill a variety of roles in their respective worlds. Guests can live out their adventures, which include sexual encounters and fights to the android's death.

Titan Comics has immediately thrust fans into a chaotic cover scene with their release of the third issue of Dishonored: The Wyrmwood Deceit. The main character, Corvo Attano, finds himself surrounded by three enemies armed with technological weapons standing tall atop menacing-looking mechanical legs. Corvo stares through his mask, ready to either strike or defend. He grips a short sword in one hand, while the other emanates a yellow and bluish-green glow. Will his powers save him or does the cover already indicate his fate?

In the annals of comic book history, the '90s are known as either the Iron Age or the Dark Age of Comics.  Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns had just come out, and people were blown away at how comics, once perceived as a kid’s medium, could portray darker subject material.  Thus, comic companies started pushing for more antiheroes, grittier stories, and attempts at realistic topics and issues.  Unfortunately, this was mostly unsuccessful, leading to dramatic bombs in the comic world, all of them trying too hard to be edgy and turning out dull, uninspired stories.  Why do I bring this up?  Because today’s comic seems to be embracing the spirit of that era.

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