Greetings, fellow Amazons! Just when you thought there couldn't possibly be more exciting Wonder Woman news coming out of the pipeline, here it is.

You seem familiar to me…

Titan’s blurb promoting their new series, The Chimera Brigade, seemed to imply a new super-verse for readers that would be set in World War II.  I thought that this was going to be something new, with the powered individuals receiving their gifts by way of chemical and radiological weapons from the trenches of The Great War.  Upon meeting this new group, however, it seems that things are going to more closely clone the Big Two than I had reasonably expected.  At first I was taken aback by it, especially with how far artist Gess went to make sure that we knew the inspiration behind each superhuman (which I’ll get into in a second).  It seems, instead, that this book will be focused more on the daughter of Madame Curie who seems slated to be a witness to history rather than its author as her mother was.

Has anyone else been reading TMNT Universe?  It’s really good, you guys!  The gods of comic books—a.k.a. Kevin Eastman, Bobby Curnow, and Tom Waltz—have created another hopefully ongoing series, and I’m curious to know if we’ll only see some characters in one series and the rest in the other.  But only time will tell… 

The Strain, the first in a trilogy of vampire wonder, has generated a continuous stream of content since its release in 2009. The originators of this tale, Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan, have seen their story adapted to many different platforms.

Bandette does not disappoint. It is phenomenal, “no?” This rhetorically wit-laden genius of a character proves that Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover can make storytelling and artwork seem easily accomplished. Bandette is the best thief in the world, and the simple fact she narrates her own action sequences shows the reader how endearing she is from the beginning.

Happy Pride Month, my fellow fairies!  I know, I know.  We celebrate pride throughout the month of June, and October is LGBTQ+ History Month.  Although, if you ask me, my husband and I are gay all year long!  Who needs a few months when you can have twelve?

The following is an interview with award-winning cartoonist and illustrator Matthew Foltz-Gray, creator of the recently released graphic novel, Tap Water and Tuna Party, through Karate Petshop. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Foltz-Gray about how he adapted his cartoon newspaper strip into a graphic novel, the bonus material that will be available to readers with the printed version, where he would like to take the property next, and more!

I hesitate to say that Sherlock Holmes, the famously brilliant and proficient detective created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, has ever fallen out of popularity, but we are certainly living in a time of heightened interest in Holmes when it comes to the pop culture scene. Between television programs like the BBC’s Sherlock and CBS’ Elementary, feature films like Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes (and its sequels), and graphic novels like Image Comics’ Moriarty, there’s no drought of exciting content to devour for fans of the world-famous detective and his various capers. Now, I, Holmes (written by Michael Lent and illustrated by Dan Parsons) can be added to the list of comic book options for Sherlock fans searching for their next fix, offering a modern-day, gender-swapped version of the detective from 221B Baker Street.

Crack open The Secret Loves of Geek Girls, and you will find comic strips, essays, memories, observations, self-help tutorials, and, most of all, very personal confessions.  In short, Secret Loves is a massive collection of individual voices of the geek and the girl varieties.  Every story has one thing in common, though…raw and honest accounts of geeks searching to understand themselves and their connections with others.

Private investigator Nick Moss doesn’t know what a missing tween, a stolen toad familiar, a kidnapped lovely lady with a gill man admirer, and a fifty-foot giantess with a potential vampire admirer have in common, but he knows he has a serious problem.  As the hairiest (and only) human PI left in Los Angeles after the Night War, Moss’ access to…certain sectors…of society is a little limited unless he embraces his inner figurative wolfman and pals around with the lycanthropic cops; however, as his cases become more entwined, the intrepid detective explores the parts of the City of Devils after dark that he never wanted to go. Will he find answers to his missing individuals’ cases, and, if he does, will Moss or his clients want the full details?

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