The following is an interview with Lee Keeler (Ryan Bartoski's Emotionally Relative Trading Card Guide, Sad Bastard) and Geoffrey Golden (Dream It! Screw It!, Frankenstein's Girlfriend), writers of the new Wet Hot American Summer: Fantasy Camp roleplaying game being released by Devastator Press.  Keeler, Golden, and Devastator Press have launched a Kickstarter campaign to fund the officially licensed role playing game (RPG) based on the classic comedy film, WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Keeler and Golden about their love of the original film, what players can anticipate from the board setup and gameplay, the awesome backer rewards available through the Kickstarter campaign, and more!

One of the fun things about Star Trek fiction is that, over time, it has brushed up against other fictional universes – sometimes very overtly, as in the Star Trek/Green Lantern or Star Trek/Planet of the Apes comics of recent years, and going at least as far back as some peculiar crossovers with the X-Men in the 1990s. Sometimes, though, these cross-dimensional encounters have to be more referential than that, for one reason or other, and that is where New Visions #15 exists. At least, I think so.

Where, oh where, has our precious time gone?  Oh where, oh where can it be?

I have never been a big fan of Steven Moffat’s run on Doctor Who; however, even I can admit that Series 10 is off to a great start.  With “The Pilot,” we have started the final season for both Moffat and star Peter Capaldi, leading to them handing off the baton to writer Chris Chibnall and the as-yet-unnamed Thirteenth Doctor this Christmas.

This series creatively meshes a variety of pre-existing characters in a freshly re-imagined Victorian London universe. Kim Newman’s brilliant script is a true tribute to literature and an artistic creation beyond Bram Stoker’s classic novel. She uses anarchists, criminals, and artists from novels, short stories, films, and even operas as characters coexisting in her version of Victorian London. As I read, I found myself searching the characters’ names and reading up on their original roles in other works. The interactions between these characters make the tale unique and creative. I appreciate that the characters are not popular, because it allowed me to enjoy learning about lesser-known figures and their stories. (I may need to go and read The Princess Casamassima after reading this series!) When a work can inspire and encourage a reader to research and explore other works, I find that to be impressive.

Mia, a scientist who has been to space looking for new life with her father, is now deep under the ocean trying to figure out who killed him. The problem is that there are more than a handful of possible suspects, all trying their best to help Mia survive on the underwater station as it literally falls apart around them, but which is trying to stop her from solving the murder.

Sometimes, it takes a fresh perspective to start knocking on new doors, and other times, it helps to step away from a problem for awhile and come back to it. Our vanished superhero team, stuck in the small town of Rockwood, hasn’t done much of the latter. They’ve been living and thinking in the mire of their situation for some time now. For each, it has had a different effect. Now, the daughter of the character who owes the book its title, Black Hammer, has found her way to Rockwood in search of him. She not only represents that fresh perspective, but a journalistic one, as well. She begins digging, and with answers come more questions, some seemingly small, and some very big.

Briggs Land is a raging thunderstorm, and the characters contained inside, particularly main character Grace Briggs, are lightning bolts – and you never know when a powerful strike will take place.

For the last year or two, Dark Horse has been publishing a comic called The Rook which is, in my opinion, everything a good time travel story should be; however, as it turns out, like several of my favorite Dark Horse titles, this one is actually a reboot of a classic comic from back in the day. Furthermore, as they often do, they’ve now begun reprinting the original comics to coincide with the reboot.

Here at Fanbase Press, we strive to provide an outlet for up-and-coming creators to promote and showcase their incredible works. With thousands of creators utilizing crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to make those works a reality, we will highlight these talented creators and their noteworthy campaigns through #CrowfundingFridays! We hope that you will join us in giving these projects a moment of your time (and possibly your support)!

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