Dealing with the death of Lloegyr national, Endre/Brother Dominic opened Penny White’s small parish life to something greater than imagination: an entire fantastical world populated by beings considered mythological by residents of the human world; however, the intoxicating lure of the magical creates a divide between her mundane life as a small-town vicar and the comparative excitement of her new position as a religious liaison between the two worlds.  Can Penny figure out what is most important to her: the constant excitement of something new or the ties with those around her? Will she make it through yet another Christmas season with its parish demands?  And, most importantly, can her human suitor ever compete with the temptation of a riveting search dragon for her heart?

In 1982, Ridley Scott directed Blade Runner, his vision of a futuristic, dystopian, neo-noir science fiction film which was loosely adapted from the Philip K. Dick novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Neon store-front lights reflect in the rain slicked Los Angeles of 2019 as brightly lit dirigibles rumbled across the dark sky, flashing elaborate advertisements overhead. All manners of life – human and replicant – commingle, trying to find meaning and memorable moments that culminate into a comforting identity. Drawing on themes of religion, technology, implications of genetic engineering, and an examination of humanity, Blade Runner has captivated decades of audiences with not one but seven versions of the 1982 film.  In honor of the original (or the six other versions) and the highly anticipated Blade Runner 2049 releasing today, Fanbase Press is running a special editorial series to examine the original film and its lasting influence in popular culture.

In 1982, Ridley Scott directed Blade Runner, his vision of a futuristic, dystopian, neo-noir science fiction film which was loosely adapted from the Philip K. Dick novel, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Neon store-front lights reflect in the rain slicked Los Angeles of 2019 as brightly lit dirigibles rumbled across the dark sky, flashing elaborate advertisements overhead. All manners of life – human and replicant – commingle, trying to find meaning and memorable moments that culminate into a comforting identity. Drawing on themes of religion, technology, implications of genetic engineering, and an examination of humanity, Blade Runner has captivated decades of audiences with not one but seven versions of the 1982 film.  In honor of the original (or the six other versions) and the highly anticipated Blade Runner 2049 releasing today, Fanbase Press is running a special editorial series to examine the original film and its lasting influence in popular culture.

When characters die in a story, it’s not always clear what the resulting impact will be from the person’s absence. In Lifeformed: Cleo Makes Contact, it’s made clear that the main character will be dealing with an alien invasion “and her father’s death.” Dark Horse Books tells you up front in the synopsis, but it’s not enough. It still doesn’t prepare the reader for the shock that comes within those pages, and that translates to the story being told by writer Matt Mair Lowery and artist Cassie Anderson.

The British Library is celebrating the 20th anniversary of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone with a new exhibit, “Harry Potter: A History of Magic.” This display will stand for approximately four months, as a “thrilling, new exhibition that will showcase a fascinating display of wizarding books, manuscripts, and magical objects and combine centuries-old British Library treasures with original material from Bloomsbury’s and J.K. Rowling’s own archives.” Bloomsbury Publishing has partnered with the library for the original work’s publication anniversary.

It’s been a long time since I’ve written about Gaga. Now that she has a new documentary out via Netflix, I certainly couldn’t let Mother Monster Down.

The following is an interview with Brandon Rhiness and Barb Briggs, creators of the upcoming TV series, Super Dryclearns, on Telus Optik. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Rhiness and Briggs about the inspiration for the series, the process by which their series was picked up for production, what they hope that audiences will take away from the show, and more!

The War for the Planet of the Apes series has been an example with each issue of how a comic book should be written and drawn. While the comic certainly ties into the feature film that was released this summer, it stands on its own in many ways and in some ways surpasses the film series. Writer David Walker has a great command over Caesar and also the narrative as a whole. He portrays Caesar as a complex and multifaceted character that is as interesting to read about as any other character in the series; however, Jonas Scharf really brings the series to the next level with his artwork.

Page 3 of 188
Go to top