God of War #1 is loud. God of War #1 is hard. God of War #1 is lush and full of ashy muscles frequently flexed and toned by its stoic protagonist, Kratos.

The Quantum Age happens in the future of Black Hammer…or does it? My mind bent at the end of this issue. There are two Black Hammer series running at once, and I have no idea how the two series are going to wrap around in on themselves.  What I do know is that something occurred that somehow got everyone to where they are in this series, and whatever happened in that series or after that series is affecting this series and maybe this series will affect that series. I’m dying to know! The end of this and the previous issue have left me breathless and gleeful. We’re seeing pieces of the puzzle completely out of order, and my mind loves puzzles.

Joe Golem: Occult Detective - The Drowning City. The world is full of mysterious dangers, with creatures and monsters out of the old serials. Mysteries abound in Manhattan, which was covered in water after an earthquake. The world of Joe Golem is like a radio play, and its characters are just as intriguing.

I was a little wary of this comic at first. On the one hand, I’m a massive fan of Dr. Horrible. (I even wrote a geeky love letter to him last year.) On the other hand, a comic where Dr. Horrible and Captain Hammer are suddenly best friends sounded like it could easily fall into the realm of weird and gimmicky.

The third chapter of the Alien franchise has always been a divisive film and, thanks to Charles de Lauzirika’s fascinating and exhaustive behind-the-scenes documentary covering the making of four original films, the studio’s troubled and treacherous path to the final product is well known among fans. Author and pioneer of the cyberpunk genre William Gibson delivered one of the first drafts commissioned for a third Alien film and, while the screenplay never made it to the silver screen, Dark Horse Comics (and the talented Johnnie Christmas) have now breathed new life into this “alternate history” for the characters of survivor Ellen Ripley, Colonial Marine Corporal Dwayne Hicks, and young Newt.

What do you get when you mix Edgar Allan Poe, syphilis, breakfast cereal, and a barnacle?

Here at Fanbase Press, we strive to provide an outlet for up-and-coming creators to promote and showcase their incredible works. With thousands of creators utilizing crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to make those works a reality, we will highlight these talented creators and their noteworthy campaigns through #CrowfundingFridays! We hope that you will join us in giving these projects a moment of your time (and possibly your support)!

Whenever I'm sitting down to review a comic, I ask myself a couple of basic questions. Is this piece something new? Am I enjoying my time with it? Does the artwork complement the writing and vise versa? And, assuming the piece is some form of adaptation or spin off, how true does it stay to the source material? That last part is especially important when it comes to Disney Afternoon Giant #1.

The following is an interview with Lonnie Hughes on the currently running production, Talking Trees. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Hughes about the inspiration behind the play, his shared process in working with the cast and crew, what he hopes that audiences will take away from the story, and more!

I've written about this series for a long time, and as it has progressed, it has gone from a weird, silly series about gods, music, and the concept of forced family to, well, a weird, silly series about gods, musick and the concept of forced family. While the major themes of the series have stayed strong, the characters and the story have moved in such amazing ways that it has become yet another opus in the careers of Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie. Together, these two creators have brought some incredible works to life with their influential run on Marvel's New Avengers and their masterpiece, Phonogram.

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