So far in American Gods, there has been very little deviation from the book, but this week the show took quite a few liberties with “Git Gone.”  While this tends to anger purists, they managed to pull it off well and illustrate how adapting a story to another medium can expand it.

The following is an interview with producer Thea Rivera regarding the upcoming premiere of the production, Nothing Bad: A Werewolf Rock Musical, at the 2017 Hollywood Fringe Festival. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Rivera about the premise of the musical performance, the theatrical debut of They Played Productions, the creative process of the ensemble, and more!

First looking at Strawberry Shortcake: Funko Universe, I was delighted by the delectably fun design of the the cover. Purple Pie Man and Berry Bird are vinyl figures made up in 3D, as if they were clay dolls in packages waiting to be ripped open and devoured. Clever, cute, and playful - it's a perfect way to start a youthful comic. The comic does not disappoint, as it is filled with vibrant colors and enticing visions of food in a plethora of forms. There are pies everywhere, houses made of pies, curly hair representing meringue, apples on trees, and surrounding it all are rainbows and bright sunshine. Even the ominous, dark sky is filled with color. The artists paints the world of Strawberry Shortcake the way a child would envision it, and as it should be… utterly edible.

Well, it’s almost the end of the month, and you know what that means…

Captivating – writer Matt Hawkins grabs readers’ attention from the beginning, and he does not let go.

“Extremis” managed to accomplish the impossible: It made me like the Sonic Sunglasses.  For a bit of reference, the Twelfth Doctor abandoned his iconic Sonic Screwdriver and, for some inane reason, replaced it with sunglasses.  I am all for shaking things up on Doctor Who, but they served no purpose.  Instead of the Doctor aiming his Sonic Screwdriver at danger, he would just look at it—which is far less dynamic.

Who would you trust more to tell you the truth: someone sane or someone lost to madness? That’s something you need to ask yourself before stepping into issue #14 of Matt Kindt’s Dept.H. With every issue, we learn more and more about what could have or may not have happened that led to the murder of Henry, Mia’s father, who was also the leader of this expedition 6 miles underwater. At this point, it’s difficult to take anyone at their word, even our hero Mia who is greatly sleep deprived. Her memories of certain events have already proven to be wrong, or have they? For me, a great mystery isn’t about how story elements are woven together. It’s more like starting with a knot and taking your time to untangle it to figure out what’s happening, and you cross your fingers hoping that there is a single thread that makes sense. Matt Kindt has created quite the knot with Dept.H. It remains to be seen how all of it will unfurl, but each step is captivating, and so far that’s a win.

I feel like I’ve missed an issue – the great thing is I wasn’t lost for long. Conan, the great warrior, has become the leader of a Kozak clan and was forced to deal in politics to save some hostages, one being a princess. Conan was immediately sexually drawn to her. When she escapes, Conan finds himself following the mysterious beauty into a suddenly resurrected ancient city. Something mysterious is going on, something beyond the understanding of humanity. Cullen Bunn has made this iteration of Conan so compelling that I was on the edge of my seat with him as he walked through streets and into buildings.

Jeff Lemire (script) and David Rubín (art and letters) must be having an absolute blast on Black Hammer. By exploring what they love most about Golden Age comics and the modern deconstruction of comic archetypes at the same time, they have made it a riveting book for this reader. Lesson: Write what you love. In this issue we get some more sci-fi romping about with Captain Weird and Talky-Walky.

Tie-in comics are generally kind of hit or miss, and that especially goes when they're tied to video games, a medium that generally allows for so much more expansive lore than any other medium can give. That goes even more so for games like the Mass Effect franchise, which is a huge, expansive universe that the games only scratch the surface of, in most single titles. As the video game series has gone on, we've learned a great deal, and that is usually gained through huge, eighty-hour playthroughs that take us on massive and beautiful journeys.

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