Why So Serious, Harley?

The first game in Rocksteady's Arkham series, Batman: Arkham Asylum (2009) uses the same voice cast as Batman: The Animated Series (including Arleen Sorkin as Harley Quinn) and was written by Paul Dini, but this Harley is different to those that have come before her. Where the Animated Harley was content to wear a onesie, this one wears a leather corset. Where the Classic Harley was happy to wear a jester's cap, this one has pig-tailed blonde hair and wears a choker. Where the Traditional Harley exuded a cheeky noir-derived sexuality, this one has ample cleavage and a bare mid-riff. Yet, this is still Harley Quinn: a red and dark-blue jester with a penchant for crime and a love of The Joker, only she's now grubbier and dressed like a '90s Britney Spears at a Bachelorette party.

Here at Fanbase Press, we strive to provide an outlet for up-and-coming creators to promote and showcase their incredible works. With thousands of creators utilizing crowdfunding platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo to make those works a reality, we will highlight these talented creators and their noteworthy campaigns through #CrowfundingFridays! We hope that you will join us in giving these projects a moment of your time (and possibly your support)!

Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox is quite possibly one of the greatest DC animated films ever created. So, when it was announced that The Flash television series (CW) would explore the concept in Season 3, a resounding cheer echoed from DC fans everywhere. Just before they had that collective, “Oh, crap, what now?” tension creep into their brains.

After spending the last week binging Supergirl Season 2, my head is swimming with thoughts and emotions about the second year of this show. The short review is: It’s fantastic. If you like Arrow or The Flash, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl. If you like engaging characters, dynamics, and good romances with pretty people, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl. If you liked Wonder Woman and want to see more optimistic superheroines, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl.

Samurai Jack Quantum Jack #1 is a strange compilation of Samurai Jack and Quantum Leap. In some way, it's like the original television series, and in some ways, it isn't. For readers, that might not be a bad thing. Similarly to the show, there is not so much dialogue used. Fabian Rangel Jr. and Warwick Johnson-Cadwell are certainly looking toward the art telling much of the story, which comics can do quite well in such a framework. In this sort of tale, Samurai Jack is taken out of his normal timeline and placed in alternate realities. It's an interesting notion of taking Jack away from his usual plain of existence and into something completely different.



Are there other ways for students to get involved with science, other than school fairs or creating demonstrations or experiments at home? Actually, if you live in Virginia near Newport News, you have a legitimate opportunity to explore the wondrous world of Jefferson Lab.

What makes a science fair a special experience for students? Is it the opportunity to learn how to do something, seeing other completed projects, or is it simply the love of creating something really cool?

The following is an interview with writer Allan Batchelder regarding his new novel, Steel, Blood, & Fire. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Batchelder regarding the inspiration behind the book, how it fits into the over Immortal Treachery series, what he hopes that readers will take away from the book, and more!

The following is an interview with playwright Kevin Armento and director Peter Richards regarding Working Barn Productions' upcoming production, Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally. In this interview, Fanbase Press Editor-in-Chief Barbra Dillon chats with Armento and Richards about the inspiration behind the show, its unconventional narrator, the shared creative process of the cast and crew, how you can purchase tickets, and more!

Robert Payne Cabeen has had a creative career penning subversive poetry and screenplays, such as Tainted Treats, the screenplay for Heavy Metal 2000, and Fearworms: Selected Poems from Fanbase Press. Cold Cuts marks Cabeen’s first foray into writing a novel, and much in alignment with his works, it’s both fiendish and funny.



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