I've written about this series for a long time, and as it has progressed, it has gone from a weird, silly series about gods, music, and the concept of forced family to, well, a weird, silly series about gods, musick and the concept of forced family. While the major themes of the series have stayed strong, the characters and the story have moved in such amazing ways that it has become yet another opus in the careers of Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie. Together, these two creators have brought some incredible works to life with their influential run on Marvel's New Avengers and their masterpiece, Phonogram.

When we last left Seven to Eternity, the Mud King and Adam were captives of the Mud King’s estranged pirate son, the Mosak were hot on Adam’s trail, and the Piper had arrived at Skod to free his father in an exposition-heavy issue. This time, we’re treated to a payoff to that slow-building momentum, making room for what comes next with a surprising ending.

The plotting in the second issue of Umbrella Academy: Hotel Oblivion is scattershot. I had to go back and read the first issue again to make sure I wasn’t missing anything. It makes sense that the story isn’t smooth; right now, the special siblings raised by a wealthy alien in human skin (Hargreeves) are currently not a team but are scattered about, each focused very much on their own goals, making this a complex, character-driven story. There are underpinnings of a story dealing with the Hotel Oblivion - a sort of prison on another planet for supervillains that has been left unattended since the untimely death of Hargreeves and a prison break.

Earlier this season, we saw an episode that was an homage to Predator, while “The Tsuranga Conundrum” was clearly modeled after Alien … if the Xenomorph was a space gremlin.  Strangely enough, this bizarre combination works.

I wish I had had this book to read when I was a kid. As a child of eight or so, I would have, if you’ll pardon the expression, eaten Time Sandwich right up. Reading it as an adult, I still ate it right up. If you know me at all, you’ll know that this kind of broad sci-fi/fantasy is the sort of thing I live for. It’s time travel at its finest.

Plough Publishing will soon release Mandela & the General, an original graphic novel by John Carlin, the author of Invictus and senior international writer for El País, and the acclaimed artist Oriol Malet. In advance of the book’s publication on November 4, 2018, this major graphic novel is generating accolades from artists, writers, actors, and actors. The publisher has been very generous to the Fanbase Press staff, as we are now able to share an advance preview!

Red, or should I say Jack, got his revenge.

Wytches: Bad Egg is a great jumping-on point for newcomers to this wonderfully haunting series by Scott Snyder. If you haven’t read the previous issues, that’s okay, because we’re given what’s essentially a crash course into the lore of Wytches.

I’ve always loved the Boston Metaphysical Society comics, from the original 6-issue arc to the more recent standalone featuring Granville Woods and Nicola Tesla. So, of course, when I heard there was a novel coming out, I was eager to read and review that, as well; however, truth be told, I didn’t think it would be quite as good as the comics. I’ve read novel adaptations of comics before, and while they’re fun, without the artwork, they usually fall short.

This isn’t your typical sci-fi story. It’s very understated—almost ordinary at times - which is not to say uninteresting. This simple, quiet story had me hooked from page one and kept me engaged all the way through.

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