SPOILERS AHEAD!!!

If you have not seen this episode, or if you are waiting to watch the series, STOP READING!   IT WILL RUIN IT FOR YOU!!!!
(Oh, and Bruce Willis is dead. That’s why Haley Joel Osment can see him.)
SEE!?!  TOLD YOU!!!  STOP READING!

If you are just joining the series, I would recommend that you start with Issue #1, as the story will make more sense; however, if you’ve been keeping up… good news! This issue tackles the complex backstory of Inspector Davitika Deal.

The Troop: Volume 1 generates more than a simple plot through a five-issue run. Writer Noel Clarke crafts misfit heroes who find themselves surrounded by violence, sex, drugs, and the overwhelming desire to survive – particularly when it involves self-defense, smashing a racist’s face in, or pure and simple revenge. These loners are not only used to being outcasts; it’s the normalcy they seek until they find each other. Clarke provides a diverse group of characters and isn’t afraid to involve vulgar language to emphasize their opinions on important matters, like staying alive.

A complex storyline mixed with ancient beings, thrilling sequences, and characters driving themselves to uphold some semblance of a moral code provide a legacy created by Bruce Zick. The Zone Continuum: Legacy was first introduced in 1992, and Dark Horse Comics brings together the four-part series in one collection for the first time.

This series continues to get more and more interesting. With the latest installment of the eight-part series, this book took a major turn as our lead, Simon Moore, finds out much more than he expected. In the last issue, he took to interrogating the crew of the Hardrian's Wall, all of them people of interest in the death of crew member Edward Madigan.  With everyone on edge, Simon's job is hard enough, and that's not taking into account the fact that Simon is addicted to pills, and someone has taken his stash from him.

Some blossoms are as beautiful as they are deadly.

Takeo and the monk travel with Wind of the Sands to infiltrate a Lord’s castle for treasure enough to free Akio from the Yakuza who have kept him hostage for his considerable gambling debt.  Little do they know what truly awaits them in the chambers of the lord.  Intrigue, action, and sultry double crosses make this issue a great addition to the series, all the while laying out the promise of much more to come.  The monk gets to tag along for the action this time, and it goes pretty much as you would expect it, while we’re left with a cliffhanger that, though an old type of trick, serves its purpose effectively, because I certainly can’t wait to see what happens next.

The longstanding story of Hideyuki Kikuchi’s Vampire Hunter D enters beautifully into the comic book world. The anime-like illustrations by Michael Broussard make the reader feel like you’re watching an animated television series, which happens to be currently in development. The first of “over 30 novels based on the titular character” began its popular run in 1983 and has since “sold more than 17 million copies and has been translated into more than a dozen languages.”

Black Hammer #5 has the wandering poeticism of Alan Moore’s early work on Swamp Thing. The great thing about Jeff Lemire’s creation is that with multiple characters, each issue can skew in style and tone to match their perspectives, and by shifting perspectives with each issue, the depth to which we are beginning to understand these characters in only five issues is wondrous and heartbreaking.

I love Matt Kindt. I read his newest comic, Ether #1, with a huge smile on my face. I entered the first page having no idea what the story was about or what I was getting myself into and enjoyed it all the more for approaching it in such a way. I’m incredibly wary of giving away too much so that anyone who wants to read this book will have the same joy in experiencing it as I had. So instead, I will write about my reactions to the book and how it compares to Kindt’s more recent work.

In Issue #3 of Lady Killer 2, Joëlle Jones nails the idea that evil comes with a smile on its face.

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