Ron Randall immediately grabs your attention with the cover page, as he introduces the main character among a barrage of weapon fire and amazing contrasts of color. Trekker: Rites of Passage defines what a tough, intelligent, and skilled, fighting female character looks like as Randall showcases Mercy St. Clair, a “trekker” – otherwise known as a bounty hunter. The cover is surrounded with vivid pops of orange, blue-green, and white colors, while Mercy doesn’t flinch as she looks back to fire her weapon in the face of a massive assault.

Thy will be done.

The world is a bit of a mess right now.  There’s a lot of crazy out there hiding behind religious texts that align with their particular brand of hating folks or perpetrating terrible acts that may not have unanimous support of modern communities.  It’s not just one religion that people are using out there, either. There are sects of just about every major religion (and slews of minor ones) that twist doctrine to make their specific brand of awful justified.  Why do I bring this up in a comic review?  Well, Leonie O’Moore’s Lord tells just such a tale, and while its protagonist is a sympathetic character to a considered majority of the population, there are those who would brand this book as pushing an agenda rather than being a wonderfully aware British-Countryside horror (Think of the movies that Hot Fuzz was based on.) that feels like it could be just as relevant in today’s world as the time period that it’s based in.

When I first opened this book, I was thrown for a bit of a loop. It’s published by Dark Horse, so I assumed it would be a graphic novel. It’s not. It’s a regular text novel of nearly 300 pages. Since these require a much bigger investment of time than comics do, I probably wouldn’t have volunteered to review it had I known up front. That said… I’m glad I did. This was a rollicking space adventure that I honestly didn’t want to put down.

Before we really get started on this review, I need to mention something, and this goes for series creators Keiron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie. You two are really making it tough to do my job here, because what is there to say about a book that has been consistently excellent for over two years? With the fourth part of the “Imperial Phase” arc underway, the team of Gillen and McKelvie have brought things to a new level as the myth of The Great Darkness, a long-thought lie of Ananke, proves to not be so untrue, doing the very little thing of attacking members of the Pantheon.

It’s a web series for the ages. Well, at least the period of the Renaissance. Okay, to be more precise, Knights of New Jersey is a web comedy series following actors through their funny exchanges with each other, cosplayers, and visitors at the Renaissance Faire. Sometimes, these moments end in a bruised ego, in more ways than one, and the overall result presents great onscreen chemistry and an entertaining comedy that seems like a seasoned ongoing series.

Being a superhero or supervillian is tough. Being a process server who serves them is even tougher. Just ask brothers Clive and Cheech and their rag-tag team in Serving Supes.

The comic series, Hex11, has had quite an adventure since its inception back in 2014. The series’ first six issues saw a release in a trade paperback collection after a successful Kickstarter campaign and was nominated for the Dwayne McDuffie Award for Diversity. The series is about to see the release of their ninth issue sometime in February, spearheaded by artist Lisa K. Weber, writer Kelly Sue Milano, and producer Lynly Forrest.

The list of well-known backers supporting the Kickstarter campaign for Myopia in August 2015 is astounding to see. The expectation for the final product’s success, for those that pledged to the campaign, exponentially increases with signed rewards from Neil Gaiman, Margaret Atwood, Dean Koontz, and George R. R. Martin, to name a few.

Wendy survived being a target of both The Guild and Andre in the final pages of Shadoworld, but it came at an incredibly painful price: the loss of her beloved Uncle Moby.  Her marriage struggled, as well, with the revelation of why Gabriel and Mike are so intertwined; however, Dreamworld jumps forward 2 ½ years with Wendy awakening in a hospital with no memory of anything past her initial examination as Pneumatikon! She faces rebuilding her identity, sense of purpose, and role in a world that continually suffers increasingly devastating natural disasters.  What is the truth behind Wendy’s mysterious memory loss? Can she still be the Wendy Whitley we’ve come to love while integrating deeply with The Guild? Where are the rest of her companions from that horrific battle for independence? Finding the answers will be a wild ride in the pages of Dreamworld!

The world is being told that "they" are dangerous. This group is feared, and one person is leading this charge to rid humanity of these unworldly beings. These spiritual entities are stuck in this realm and “the media calls them ‘Spectrals.’ To the rest of the world, they are rotting corpses, best left to die.” These different looking creatures must find a means to survive, but everyone else hates them - except those that have a need for mercenary work, or in other cases, a “backstreet dentist.” Even though they file their grievances similarly to others, in a bar having drinks with friends, they understand their place in the world as being alone, and they find solace in identifying themselves as a member of the group, “Cadavers.”

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