Charles "Chuck" Higgins was at the wrong place at the wrong time when he bumped into an inebriated space traveler named Joppenslik "Jopp" Wenslode. Quickly captured by the Prime Partners Intergalactic Consortium, Chuck and Jopp are forced to work together, hauling cargo between space destinations. Their friendship is solidified when Haaga Viim and his crew of mercenary space pirates attack Jopp and Chuck’s cargo ship, causing them to crash on an outpost planet. The madcap adventure takes off from there, and after some plot twists and red herrings, the pair solve their crisis.

In his previous book, Stay Younger Longer, author Ryan Hyatt conjured up a world not so far from our own, where eco-politics carried more weight than they should, the search for the next party was everyone’s greatest quest, and California set the standard of living for the nation.

Like a Hollywood bio-pic Milo Manara tackles the life of the genius artist Caravaggio, giving us explanations of what inspired his greatest works and who his female muses were, as well as his greatest adversaries. In the end, however, the story presented by Manara feels more like an explanation of events than an actual story.

Have you ever sat and listened to someone try and tell you their dream? Of course you have. No matter how interesting or crazy the dream is, there’s always a disconnect. You’re always just out of reach of the experience, because it’s not your dream. At its best, reading a comic book is like living in someone else’s dream, usually a handful of people. You’re sent on a journey, experience the adrenaline, and feel the feels. There is a tangible intersection, a crossroads of the conscious and subconscious.

Rock Candy Mountain, written and drawn by Eisner-nominated Kyle Starks, takes its silliness seriously and is serious in a very silly way, and wins because of it. This is a world with hobos, hobo mafias, and Satan. (Literally, the guy with horns makes an appearance.) Ya see, Satan is looking for someone and that someone is Jackson, and Jackson is looking for something and that’s Big Rock Candy Mountain. Yes, from the song.

In the introduction, the writer of the original Aliens comic book, Mark Verheiden, states that in the original publication, they weren’t able to call the characters Newt or Hicks due to interference with the chronology of the third film in the series. I’m ever so happy to report that this has finally been corrected, and everyone will finally be able to see what happened to Newt and Hicks if they weren’t killed like a Shakespearean character – off screen.

You know those days in which it feels like nothing will turn out in your favor; no matter how much you accomplish, nothing goes right for you. Emmy, the protagonist of Harrow County, has had a twenty-two-issue run of this. No matter how hard she tries, there’s something right around the corner to test her, and those things usually pertain to demons and ghosts (Here known as haints.) and god-like brothers and sisters, only now she has to contend with one of her only friends, Bernice.

In this issue, Rani and her team muster up their resources to prepare for the imminent war with the fae. Their initial fight is playfully violent, with spaceman Merlin’s magical help and an amusing use of weaponry after Rani cuts off a faerie’s arm. Rani is a strong, aggressive fighter. Adam P. Knave and D.J. Kirkbride have created a fearless woman who learns how to tap into her inner magical ruler abilities amid a faerie attack brought forth from another realm.

What do you do when a god asks you to be his personal assistant? Shadow Moon does not quite jump at this opportunity in the second issue of American Gods: Shadows, but when left with no better options, he finds himself accepting the offer. Shadow seems to be looking for something to do with his life, especially now that his wife is dead. He’s a little lost in the world, which Mr. Wednesday notices and takes advantage of.

The Stone Heart, the second installment in Faith Erin Hicks’ The Nameless City trilogy, picks up a few months after the events of the first volume.  (Check out my review of The Nameless City, the first volume in The Nameless City trilogy by Faith Erin Hicks.)  Rat and Kai are at their leisure in the palace.  Rat’s leg is healing, and she’s almost ready to challenge Kai to fresh parkour racing through the city.  Kai’s father, Andren, is hard at work negotiating deals to get the Council of Nations up and running.  The General of All Blades is grappling with his son’s ambitious nature, and Maru continues to harbor mysterious, manipulative motivations.

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