I love punk music. I love the punk attitude, but I am in no way punk. A person would never in their right mind point at me and say, “That dude is punk.” I don’t even know if punks use the term, “dude.” I love stories about punk characters. In Home Sick Pilots, we meet a group of three high school friends who are a punk band. They are called HOME SICK PILOTS! Their nemesis is another punk band called the Nuclear Bastards, with a couple more band members. Yes, our heroes are outnumbered, and, yes, they go to one of Nuclear Bastard’s concerts at an empty bowling alley that’s packed.

It dawned on me after reading issue 2 of Crossover who Donny Cates was. In one of the ads on the very last page, they advertise his book, Buzz Kill, which I had read upon its release and thought it was incredible. If I had kept his name ingrained in my head, I would have picked up everything he had written as he went along. Thankfully, his name is now synonymous with two series that I love, the second being the one that I’m currently writing about.

Adventureman gives a modern perspective to the adventure stories that were popular in the pulp novels of the ‘20s, the film serials of the ‘30s, and the radio dramas of the ‘40s. There are colorful characters, dastardly villains, and a whole world of possibilities. In short, it’s the sort of comic that’s right up my alley.

Ghosts, djinns, and other supernatural beings inhabit this charming and fun alternate history/steampunk fantasy set in a Cairo, where the British have been expelled and Egypt has become a world power in their own right.  

Shedding is a strange, surreal film that is beautifully shot. I’m still not entirely sure what to think about it, but I definitely enjoyed it.

Would you like to learn how to have a career in comics? Contour draw? Draw likenesses? How about how to talk to a celebrity? Eat spicy food? Herd cats? Train your doppelgänger? Do you enjoy silly, but yet super creative, comics by a score of different comic creators like Gail Simone, Gene Ha, Jill Thompson, and Mark Buckingham? If so, then Hey, Amateur published by IDW is definitely worth a look.

Viewers may still be on an emotional high after last week’s much-applauded appearance of Ahsoka Tano on The Mandalorian, but, as this week’s episode makes clear, we ain’t seen nothing yet. Ever since actor Temuera Morrison made his stunning cameo on Tatooine at the end of the first episode of the season, fans have been waiting for the reappearance of Star Wars’ most feared bounty hunter ever. With this episode, courtesy of series creator Jon Favreau and director Robert Rodriguez, the wait is over.

"I saw my baby, trying hard as babe could try."

Mercy, written and illustrated by Mirka Andolo and originally published as a 6-issue limited series, focuses on the small mining village of Woodsburgh in the Victorian Age. The town is plagued by a creature (or creatures) killing innocents by tearing them open and eating their insides. Two mysterious strangers arrive in town, Lady Hellaine and Mr. Goodwill. They have secrets which become strained when a young orphan girl, Rory, comes into their lives. Also introduced are the widow and brothel owner Lady Swanson, siblings Jon and Betsy, and Native American creature hunters who are intent on destroying what has become known as the “Devil of Woodsburgh.”

"The Impact of Audio" review series will examine the impact that audiobook narration has on our relationship with the stories we love. We will be taking a look back at titles with which we may already be familiar, as well as exploring newly released publications . . . all with the goal of exploring how this vital form of storytelling connects us to the ways #StoriesMatter.

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