I can see a potential path beginning to form: the possibility of where this may be going. Black Hammer is a psychological superhero mystery. I imagine it would be what the superhero genre would look like if Philip K. Dick had any interest in it. A team of heroes has been stuck on a farm for 10 years. Up until now, the events surrounding this have been a mystery. Instead, we’ve been drawn into this secluded and compartmentalized world in which these characters are ghosts of their former selves simply trying to maintain. It has been ponderous, exciting, heartbreaking, disturbing; it has been a joy to read.

When I received word Magdalena was making a print comeback, I was super excited. Being one of the first comics I had ever picked up, it was nice to see another former pull list staple from the Top Cow Universe was soon to make reappearance on comic book shelves.

That's not the deal.

After Logan, it's kind of hard not to want to dive into more post-apocalyptic westerns.  Luckily, there are quite a lot of them.  Unfortunately, there's slightly less a number that are good, but Randall P. Fitzgerald has put something together that will engage and excite.  I know that's an odd thing for a Western to do, but the blended style actually works for the novel, Husks, he's put together.  I'm going to be honest: I've a mighty distaste for trilogies of late, but the part of this novel that stands on its own is well worth the time. 

The opening pages to Scott Larson’s Visitations: The Great Balloon Disaster make it abundantly clear that the mixture of history and supernatural fun in the first issue were no accident.  He skillfully blends historic figures and events like suffragette Elizabeth Booth and the annual Fourth of July balloon races into a tale that provides insight into Clayton Blackwood’s lovely young companion, Miss Nellie McCullough (and her very special equine friend, Kincaid).

Doc Yeti is the kind of bizarre story that just can’t help but draw you in. It has everything: noir, action, mystery, comedy… and yetis. I don’t think I’ve ever read a comic about yeti culture before. It’s intriguing, to say the least.

The anomaly, my ship, my crew,  I suppose you're worried about your fish, too.

Ever wonder what the cartoon Scooby Gang and the Buffy Scoobies have in common with Beetlejuice or the Ghostbusters? Maybe not, but the obvious answers aside, it's the music. Tell me you have never sung along to the Ghostbusters theme song or nodded your head when "Jump in the Line" comes on at the end of Beetlejuice. If you're reading reviews at Fanbase Press, I'm going to go out on a limb and say you've seen at least one of those. In fact, I'm almost positive some of you just nodded your heads and sang, "We ain't 'fraid of no ghosts!" Coady and the Creepies would fit in with them well, if we only had a soundtrack for the comic.

The Forever War #2 continues the comic book adaptation of the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning book by Joe Haldeman. During the course of the first chapter, Haldeman explores the depths of space, along with the training associated with fighting an alien species that has already attacked colonists. The depth of physical and emotional endurance has been tested and death has come at the expense of learning under extreme conditions.

John Arcudi has been around since the '90s, writing everything from Aquaman to Hellboy to Aliens. I’ve seen his name on comics that I’ve read, but I don’t think (of what I’ve read) anything has quite hit me like Dead Inside. This feeling took me by surprise. Dead Inside is a murder mystery set within the confines of a prison system. The first issue set things in motion; it didn’t quite grab me, but it was interesting enough to continue on. After four issues, I’m hooked.

From issue to issue, Matt Kindt’s books are a thrill to read, and Ether is no exception. We’ve been following the story of a scientist, Boone, who travels into another dimension, a fantastical one called the Ether, to solve crimes and disprove the magic of the world. As it turns out, this fantastical world is pretty dark at its core, and Boone, like an addict it seems, has slowly lost his life to it. In the Ether, he is a hero. He is Sherlock Holmes and Indiana Jones rolled up into one. In the real world, he lives on the street and has pushed everyone he cares about away from him. Even the way to get into the Ether could only ever be discovered by someone willing to basically kill themselves.

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