In the opening pages of the second issue of Errand Boys, readers catch up with Jace and Tawnk as they are hurled into space via an unsettling slingshot launch. (Catch my review of issue one here.) The half-brothers are headed out on their first mission together in this issue, which is part of a five-issue galactic action adventure tale from writer D. J. Kirkbride, artist/colorist Nikos Koutsis, flatter Mike Toris, and letterer/designer Frank Cvetkovic.

There’s something incredibly unsettling about stalkers. Maybe it’s the way they creep about in the shadows, watching but rarely being seen. Maybe it’s their ability to dive into the darkest crevices of their obsession’s life, getting to know their victim intimately. Whatever it is, they are just about the creepiest criminals ever.

Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips are changing the landscape of the comic book industry. Their two names are essentially a stamp of quality when it comes to graphic novels and storytelling. Their new story, My Heroes Have Always Been Junkies, is about two people, Ellie and Skip, who find love in a rehab center and decide to run away together. Ellie is self-aware enough to realize that she’s a bad influence, but as their romance grows, mysteries begin to unravel. The question, however, is if the mysteries are worth it in the end.

Issue #2 of Geek-Girl left Summer getting pummeled by one of Maine’s resident baddies after Ruby reclaimed the power-up glasses.  A streak of good luck brings Neon Girl to her rescue, but Summer has to accept that while she didn’t do any major harm with the glasses, she’s a danger to herself without them if she fights crime. Meanwhile, Ruby allows her old friends to entice her back into their circle with a party and drinks at a local bar, but it just can’t stay quiet when the original Geek-Girl is back on the town!

  

In his debut creator-owned work, writer Ryan Cady wanted to explore the concept of rebuilding after the world ends.  With that concepet, we get Infinite Dark, a new science fiction/horror series from Image Comics and Top Cow Productions. Exploring how the human race moves on and rebuilds after the entire universe goes dark, this series is equal parts unsettling and overwhelming. The entire concept of the heat death of the universe is something deeply unnerving, and seeing what happens to those who are still alive is, somehow, even more horrific.

Image Comics publishes some very interesting and weird titles, a pattern that has been a great trend for the company overall. With their dedication to allowing creators to really make the things they want to make, some incredible titles are released. One of those interesting and very weird titles is the new and best-named comic book series, Murder Falcon, which mixes action, humor, and a whole lot of metal.

Characters in The Weatherman do things that your ten-year-old self thought would be badass, and they somehow survive. Pulling off feats of unnatural, physical prowess, these non-superheroes are fearless and inspire awe and a sense of extreme danger in the reader.

The third iteration of Joe Golem: Occult Detective takes on the name of its location: The Drowning City, because it’s a place that we should know. Lower Manhattan has been changed drastically; water has flooded every street, and we have no idea what could come from around the next corner. One recognizable element Joe Golem does keep is the hard-boiled film noir element that is so often tied to New York City. Like much of the rest of the Mignolaverse, dark arts are being practiced in all of the shadows. In this instance, the shadows are underwater, a submarine to be specific.

Before I begin my review, I feel the need to lay out some ground rules as the use of pronouns in Doctor Who have become much more complex.  For the sake of simplicity, I plan on using the current Doctor’s gender when referring to the character in general, but when discussing a specific iteration of the Doctor, I will use that regeneration’s gender.

Even though the Quantum Age happens in the future of the Black Hammer universe, it wavers back and forth between being written like a Golden Age science fiction tale and something that might be written now. It begins with a character named Archive talking to a disembodied voice only called Mother. Archive is part of a collective race, like the Borg minus the conquering other species aspect. Archive wants to go into the world to see what it’s like to be human and to come back and report the data he finds. He’s thrilled about this, and shortly after entering school, he becomes a member of the Quantum League, with races and species all around the galaxy, fighting for justice and protecting the innocent, but as with every story in the Black Hammer universe, nothing is ever that simple.

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