As much as I love superheroes, my main fascination has always been with the supervillains. So, it probably goes without saying that I’m really enjoying this comic. But this is a review, so I guess I need to say it anyway: This comic is a lot of fun.

Science meets future-noir in the comic book series, The Resurrected, created and written by Christian Carnouche. As mentioned in my review for the first issue back in January, this series is set in the near future, where technology has been developed to end death and suffering through loss; however, the cost of that technology was high: 30 million people. Not only does Carnouche explore the philosophical ramifications of that cost, but he also seeks to analyze corporate and religious implications.

The Peanuts gang are some of the most beloved characters ever written. They proved themselves iconic by maintaining a run of syndicated Sunday morning comic strips that lasted from 1950 to 2000. Charles Schulz is a brilliant author, and BOOM! Studios has collected a handful of his works - beautifully preserved and carefully curated. This is the tenth volume in the series, each one as good as the last, and all of them just as philosophically existential. 




One of the funniest books in comics has taken on a more serious term as of late, and with this volume of the story, that rings very true. In a series that is full of sex jokes, pop culture references, and more sex jokes, the last volume has begun its descent into a more serious tone.  While this collection has some of the trademark silliness Sex Criminals is known for, a lot is happening for Jon, Suzie, and the rest of the team.

“The truth is, running a campaign is equal parts excitement and narrowly avoiding being hit by a car.
Your future is on the line with every decision.”

Last month, publisher Bliss on Tap continued its high-speed zombie comic book series with the release of Train 8: The Zombie Express #2, picking up right where it left off on a rollercoaster ride of terror.  As part of a three-issue series, the second installment maintained a palpable tension throughout, leaving readers worried as to when a flesh-eating walker might appear from around the next corner.

The idea of identity is one of the more prominent themes that seems to be recurring throughout Shanghai Red, and it’s one that I didn’t expect to be so invested in.

I’ve been reading a lot of Jeff Lemire’s books recently. He’s an exceptional writer. Not every choice he makes as a creator lands with me on a personal level, but Black Hammer is one of the things that does. Maybe because it’s about fitting in - finding a group of people, or a person, that you can be comfortable with. That loves you. But doesn’t the X-Men do that? For me, The X-Men is about not being hated for who you are. I never get the sense that any of the X-Men are lonely, because they have each other to depend on (and they’re always dating each other). In Black Hammer, our heroes each need something on a personal level; they each need to be loved for who they are.

Dark Horse has released a brand new series titled Beasts of Burden: Wise Dogs and Eldritch Men. As somewhat of a Lovecraft fan, I read the word “Eldritch” and yelled “yippee!” Are you meaning to tell me there's a chance that this series will feature themes and concepts inspired by the works H.P. Lovecraft? Well, after reading the very first issue, I can confidently report that the answer is...maybe?

I think that just about every comic book fan alive in 1993 knows where they were when they found out Superman died. I was in a grocery store checkout line, jaw scraping the floor, and wide eyes that wouldn’t go away for weeks. How was it possible that one of the biggest heroes of my childhood could die? It wasn’t like we were talking about Aquaman (who wasn’t so cool back then – poor Aquaman). This was the Man of Steel. Heroes like him just didn’t die.

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