Two issues ago, the superhero family of Black Hammer made a decision to jump back into the reality of Spiral City (their own world) despite the fear of Anti-God (their greatest villain) returning with them. This was after having solved the mystery of how they ended up at the farm. Then, issue #7 happened. It was bonkers and wonderful. It took the idea of “meta” in this series to its most playful and heightened conclusion. That was what happened to the reality-hopping Colonel Weird. Now, in issue #8, we find our way to some of the other members of the team. If issue #7 was about where all of the unused ideas go to die, then issue #8 is about a world with no stories. Of all the issues of the series so far, this resembles our own, the reader’s world. The most tragic place for a superhero to end up is, of course, a place where they are no one, where they no longer mean anything to the world and they have no ambition.

Issue #4 begins with all-out carnage, action, and horror sprayed on every page. You can feel the panic and the hurry continuously building as each of the panels reveals more and more of the chaois the Jinoo release throughout Harlem. Of course, the Jinnoo, it turns out, are the least of our characters’ worries, as the Sangerye family may end up losing one of their own.

In The Life of Nill, candles are personified beings who travel between cities illuminated by light, sending messages to and from the cities themselves. We’re introduced to Nill and Lueb, two candles who routinely travel out to the dark under orders of the elder. But, when Lueb decides to head out on her own, Nill chases after her, and his life is forever changed.

The city of Skod, a city of horror in the heavens of Zhal for Adam and the Mud King, becomes that much more like Hell with the arrival of the Pied Piper. Now, horrid son against horrid son are trying to save and kill a horrid father, and a man with the world’s salvation resting on his shoulders are left, leaving the cursed citizens of Skod to deal with the repercussions of their untimely and unwelcome arrival.

Judge Dredd has been around for 42 years.  He has been the source of endless books and comics and two feature films.  So, if you’re going to take on a character with that level of pedigree and history, you'd better do it right.  Writer Paul Jenkins and artist Marco Castiello got it right.

It wasn’t that I had my doubts about Black Badge. After finishing The Grass Kings, I’d put my trust in the creative team of Matt Kindt, Tyler Jenkins, and Hillary Jenkins any time. Like The Grass Kings, Black Badge took a few issues to settle into itself. The entirety of issue seven had me exclaiming out loud at the end, “Oh, sh*t!”

I’m fully aware that fans of something can inflate their initial experience with their fandom, turning it into a perfect achievement that nothing can ever touch.  After binging season one of The Umbrella Academy over two days, on the third day I went back to read the first two volumes of the Dark Horse comic book series by Gerard Way and Gabriel Bá, and I’m glad I did, because it freed me to write a review unfettered from my initial experience with the comics.

I’ve been waiting expectantly for a month. Since turning that final page of issue eight, I’ve been asking myself, “Is this the week?” “Did I miss it last week?” “Did it come out on time?” Finally, it’s here, and I could read issue nine over and over again and still love it, still find something to pull from it. It’s full of regret, pain, disgrace, and treats someone who is finally dealing with being honest with themselves in a pretty direct way, which can be the most difficult thing to deal with: realizing that it’s your fault.

I was about seven years old when my brother first showed me Starcraft. This juggernaut of a game was instrumental in forming my tastes on the science fiction genre as a whole. The series is now best known for its competitive scene, but I was fascinated with the exciting and mysterious lore the game hinted at in its campaign. I, admittedly, dropped off with the series around the time of Heart of the Swarm, but Starcraft Volume 1: Scavengers, with its retro logo and cover art, reminded me of those early days playing the game on some long-forgotten PC.

Errand Boys, the five-issue miniseries from Image Comics, concludes with the last issue that will drop this Wednesday.  Written by D.J. Kirkbride (Amelia Cole, The Once and Future Queen), this sci-fi space adventure follows half-brothers Jace and Tawnk as they try to stay one step ahead of the law and firmly rooted amongst the living.  They are also getting to know each other as they seek common ground in which to establish a familial relationship.  

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