We're really living in a golden age of webcomics. I'm old enough to remember their early days. They were mostly short-format comedy pieces or over-wrought teenage dramas. Now, webcomics can have sweeping narratives and art to rival any major publisher, and they’re getting trade paperback editions and anime adaptations! Give it a few years, and we'll be seeing webcomic films! Ophiuchus is one of these webcomics that now sees itself reaching new audiences in the form of a trade paperback.

Presenting the final volume of Eerie Archives, a 320-page grand finale to the complete collection of one of the most acclaimed comics magazines of all time.  With tales of terror and adventure by comics’ finest creators, Eerie Archives volume 27 goes out with a resounding bang! Collects Eerie #132 - #139.

After being swallowed by a perilous creature, Canto and the Malorex are thrust into the belly of the beast. But not all is what it seems, as they are confronted by the Hermit who happens to look like the slavers of Canto’s people. From there, Canto is told the truth of the slavers and how they themselves are enslaved by an even greater foe.

In the last issue of The Weatherman, our space crew of hired hands led by Amanda ran into a brick wall. You see, they are transporting Nathan Bright, a celebrity weatherman, to Earth to find a scientist that can upload his original brain into his body.  His original brain was that of a terrorist who wiped out almost the entire population of Earth, and with more terrorist plots to be discovered, they need that original brain back in him. Instead of finding the scientist they wanted, they found her grave… but her work may still be out there.

Somehow, I missed issue four of She Could Fly: The Lost Pilot when it came out, so I recently sat down and re-read issue three, then four, and finally issue five. My heart is filled to the brim, and my brain is bouncing around.

There’s nothing more frightening than a smile drawn by Andrea Sorrentino. Obviously, the smiles in issue 16 of Gideon Falls carry a lot of weight and context, as Jeff Lemire throttles the story forward in one fell swoop.

I cackled multiple times throughout this issue, because it’s so perfect. As far as two companies and two universes crossing over, Jeff Lemire has found the perfect vehicle to handle such a venture. Black Hammer is a world of stories; it’s so meta that, at one point, we even get to see the creators of these stories, albeit in a very surreal way. Justice League is exactly what Black Hammer is commenting on, so to flip the two worlds gives Jeff Lemire so much room to play.

Think what you may about Disney's recent string of films, but the company’s mascot, Mickey Mouse, has been enjoying a resurgence these past few years. There was a time in the early 2000s when the famous mouse was starting to lose his stardom and other Disney characters were coming to fill the spotlight. But, ever the stalwart, Mickey welcomed his 90th anniversary with a bevy of quality comics and the phenomenal Mickey Mouse TV series. As part of that celebration, Mickey Mouse: The Quest for the Missing Memories, an eight-part miniseries, was released in late April of 2019.

I’ve been a fan of the DC Universe animated movies since they began in 2007. They’ve created some fantastic films and told some amazing stories. That being the case, Batman: Hush has a lot to live up to. Does it succeed? Well, it doesn’t quite have the depth, or the quality, of some of the best DC Universe films, but it’s certainly fun and enjoyable.

Page 3 of 116
Go to top