Cold Spots follows the story of an absentee father who is hired by his wealthy stepfather to find their wife/daughter, Alyssa, respectively, but, more importantly, the daughter that she has taken with her, Grace. Cullen Bunn enjoys crossing his genres, and this horror story is no exception, falling somewhere between gothic and noir. The father, Dan, sets off on a supernatural detective story that finds people instantaneously frozen to ice when touched by the supernatural predators.

The third issue of Aliens: Dust to Dust loses some of the magic of the first two issues.

Whether you are traveling to the Para-Zone for the first time, or coming back for more, there is always something to discover in Black Hammer.

Last year, Robert Arnold successfully crowdfunded the first two issues of Replicator, a series that he created and wrote. Replicator is a future-noir crime drama liberally seasoned with corporate intrigue. In the first issue, the story focused on border patroller Ryker Jones and his wife Sarah, a scientist, who has discovered a cure for a virus outbreak known as the Red Death. Things go awry and in the second issue, and the story shifts to a military battle with mechs and the introduction of a new character. The latter half of the issue rejoins with Ryker and Sarah.

The Resurrected is an ongoing series set in the near future where science has advanced to the point of ending death and suffering by offering eternal life. As readers learned in the first pages of the series, the cost of this technology was high: the death of 30 million people. In this future-noir series, writer/creator Christian Carnouche critically analyzes the philosophical ramifications of that cost. Additionally, Carnouche draws on the plight of the aboriginal people over the centuries, giving voice to a group of individuals that have had little to no representation in Westernized comics. It is a factor that sets this independent series apart and makes it a worthy read.

When I first heard that Doctor Who would be visiting Rosa Parks in Montgomery, Alabama, during 1955, I was a bit nervous.  The show has a tendency to go wild with the sci-fi elements when meeting historical figures (such as HG Wells meeting lizards known as Morlox or Shakespeare fighting alien witches).  At times, this can be fun; although, it could easily disrespect her contribution to the Civil Rights Movement.

Mob Psycho 100: Volume 1 had me hooked from the get go. It was originally written by ONE, the writer/artist responsible for the absolutely fantastic One Punch Man. On top of that, Mob Psycho 100 sells itself on the premise of a character with overwhelming psychic abilities which sounded reminiscent of the landmark Japanese film, Akira. Basically, going into Mob Psycho 100: Volume 1, I had every reason to be excited.

Gideon Falls is conceptually one of the scariest comic books I’ve ever read, and the very first collected volume is available just in time for Halloween.

Bonehead - now THAT is a title. The word itself alludes to a doltish, neanderthal, half-wit, or stupid person; however, in the context of the story, it refers to a person who belongs to one of many parkour gangs that run around doing cool tricks using only their bodies! All of the aforementioned Boneheads have uniquely decorated helmets that distinguish them from other (different) Boneheads. The book is published by Image Comics / Top Cow and dares to answer the question, “What if The Warriors was made in 2010?”

It’s been nearly three years since I discovered (and subsequently reviewed) the Lumberjanes comic. It’s an amazing title, and I had nothing but great things to say about it. Unfortunately, I missed out on the opportunity to review the subsequent volumes and fell hopelessly behind on the story which is why I was so excited about this volume: a new, standalone Lumberjanes adventure.

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