Every action has a purpose, and every victory a price.

Remember when you were the loser in high school for not playing D&D? All the most popular and sexually active teens were doing it? Rollin' d20s like it ain't no thang. They like to hit that with multiple crit. Naw, I'm sayin' my DMs? Remember?

Rick and Morty is a strange franchise, known for being outlandish, kind of gross, and just a bizarre mix of science, humor, and some truly outrageous visuals. The comics for the franchise have been no different, keeping the same sense of personality and ridiculousness that the show is known for, without the tricky animation budgets and writing delays.

Over the past three issues, we’ve seen Adamant, the indestructible superhero, in a number of different adventures and predicaments, both past and future, as he battles his nemesis, Dr. Alpha. Now, in issue #4, we finally get to see the origin story: how Adamant came to be and how his destiny and Dr. Alpha’s became inextricably intertwined.

Someone is trying to kill one of the most famous assassins in the world. So, what does he do? He tries to hire all of the other greatest assassins in the world to protect himself. That’s it. That’s the concept of this story. It’s a high-concept shoot-em-up. You can expect a lot of ego to be thrown around from characters that have elevated eccentricities, and a lot . . . a LOT of bullets to be fired. If you saw Brie Larson in Free Fire, Joe Carnahan’s Smokin’ Aces, or Shoot’em Up with Clive Owen, or… you get it. There’s an entire subgenre of film that’s poked its head over the horizon in the last decade or so.

This was great. I sat down this evening to write reviews feeling uninspired, disinterested, and tired. As I scrolled through the first issue of Little Bird, as each page passed, as every panel erupted from the page, I slowly began to wake up and, by the end, a fire had lit in me.

After the heat death of the universe, the last of humanity has gathered on the Orpheus station, awaiting the next big bang. For two years, they stare helplessly into the void, and then all of a sudden, something stares back. Infinite Dark: Vol. 1 collects the first four issues of writer Ryan Cady and artist Andrea Mutti's thoughtful science fiction horror.

If you've only been following the Steven Universe TV show and haven't delved into the comics, I have a secret for you: They're amazing. If you have no clue what Steven Universe is, then here's an extra secret: It's amazing. I've only had a few opportunities to pick up these comics in the past, but every time has been a delight. Steven Universe: Fusion Frenzy #1 was no exception.



The entire story arc of LaGuardia up to this point has been building towards the birth of Future’s child. Then, at the end of the previous issue, it finally happened: Future and her fiancé Citizen (newly arrived from Nigeria) saw the birth of their son Future Citizen. Now, this final issue is about what happens in the aftermath.

Welcome back to the Hellmouth (Part 3)! Let’s begin with a quick recap as per Cordelia (turns out Cordy is the “Previously on…” narrator): Buffy’s trying to find the magical necklace of vampire invulnerability, Xander is feeling left out, Willow is feeling insecure about her run for student body president against Cordelia, Giles is being not very supportive, Anyanka is being tortured by Drusilla for info about a power source, and Cordy had some mild flirtation with Spike, a mysterious British stranger that’s easy on the eyes. That about catches us up on where this issue starts.

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