For those who enjoyed the unpredictability and edginess of Stranger Things, Netflix’s new series, The OA - co-created by Brit Marling and Zal Batmanglij - needs to be next up on their binge-list. The OA raises questions about the world, the afterlife, and the space in between. This 8-episode season incites hope and bridges connections in unexpected places. Each episode traces the story of Prairie (Brit Marling), a young blind woman who has been missing for seven years. When she returns home, now calling herself the OA, her sight has mysteriously been restored. The FBI, her parents, and the local news reporters all want to hear her story, but Prairie finds a group of five misfits to share it with in hopes that they can help her save the lives of others. The show is thrilling but offers hope in dire circumstances, creates community among unlikely individuals, and demonstrates what willpower can achieve. And the story is so compelling that the end of each episode demands starting the next.

Marc Jackson has created a weird, silly, and humorous take on space exploration. Your imagination can’t prepare you for the shenanigans the main character finds himself in. Not only will you wonder where this story is going, you might wonder how a simple run to the local space market, looking for “blue milk,” could go quite so awry.

As it starts to seem like this season is finally getting closer to providing some answers, Episode 5 shakes things up and raises more questions. As a whole, this show is driven by its mysterious plot, while its setting provides a disturbing, but artistic, appeal. The acting supports these other elements but is not the crux of the show’s success. That’s okay, though, because the audience does not need to be emotionally invested in the characters to appreciate the uniqueness of the show’s storyline and the remarkable attention to detail the creators have paid in building both versions of America.

Justin Robinson’s novel, Coldheart, introduced readers to the world of the Magi, gods and super-powered beings struggling for control over Earth; however, that novel focused predominantly on the Twins, the powerful beings that claim responsibility/ownership over North America.  The second novel in the series, The Daughter Gambit, is a selection of short stories that provides some insights into the members of the other Magi groups. 

First encounters with alien species might seem like an entertaining prospect. There is a romanticized quality from major franchises like Star Trek and Star Wars, yet history proves this is not always the case. In particular, the recent introduction of “Engineers” from the film, Prometheus, proves that discovering new life can be absolutely terrifying.

When I first heard about the massive crossover that Top Cow Productions was undertaking with the release of Eden's Fall, a series that would take three of their top titles (Postal, The Tithe ,and Think Tank) and place them all together, I was incredibly excited. The company, along with fearless leader Matt Hawkins, has always been one of the more interesting smaller publishers on the market, taking big chances with very unique titles. It seemed only fitting that they take all of their work and fold them into one another, something that could lead to a wholly new kind of crossover.

The Deep is an all-ages adventure that gets it right with the first issue. This currently formatted six-issue series, which can also be seen as an animated series on Netflix, presents a fun glimpse into the ever-wondrous world of the deep blue sea.

Pending death by monstrous creatures while equally trying to survive an endless wasteland with an unrelenting blizzard might not seem like a valid, five-star vacation, or adventure for that matter, but for those familiar with the world of Dungeons & Dragons, it might be a quest for the ages.

The first story arc, “The Hunt for the Dire Beast,” is concluding with issue five of Battlecats, a digital comic book series from Florida-based Mad Cave Studios. In fact, it is hard to believe but it was a year ago that I reviewed the premiere issue of this series. Hopefully, you have been following the progress of my reviews and perhaps even started reading the series yourself. In case you are not familiar with the series, this is an epic fantasy tale that follows a squad of warrior cats – Battlecats, in case you didn’t catch the titular title – who have been sent on a quest by King Eramand III to return with the head of the kingdom’s arch nemesis, the La Marque dire beast.

Do you love zombies? Whether your answer is yes or no, wouldn’t you agree you would prefer to be chased by the likes of the Night of the Living Dead? Their pace was somewhat of a leisurely jaunt compared to more recent alternatives. It would have to be a better circumstance than trying to outrun one in Zombieland. If you’re still unsure about what kind of undead you’d rather be surrounded by in a zombie apocalypse, then perhaps you should check out the opening sequence to Dawn of the Dead. Have you been convinced that the slower-paced “walking dead” would be the better choice?

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