Whereas James Tynion IV and Erik Donovan’s previous collaborations, Cognetic and Memetic, have been structured around a three-issue story arc that was confined to a specific time and place, their new three-issue story, Eugenic, reads more like Ray Bradbury’s Martian Chronicles. It sets up a specific event and then hops to different points in time with different characters to further the world and themes. I want to see more stories set in this world even though I feel this third issue didn’t quite capture my imagination and emotional involvement like the first two issues. Its heart is in the same place as we jump into the future again with some big ideas. It’s depressing and sad, but not in a way that struck chords. If anything, this third issue seems more like a pitch for a much larger story – one I’d like to see.

A lonely, brooding detective takes on the case of an ex-girlfriend, only to have two things confirmed: He won’t get the girl, but is he a great detective.

The first volume of Black Hammer was great. This one is even better. The more I read, the more I want to read, and the more engrossed I become in the world that writer Jeff Lemire and artist Dean Ormston have created. It’s a mystery that unfolds page by page, issue by issue, full of incredible characters and brilliant twists. I can’t recommend this comic enough.

The Jem and the Holograms: Dimensions comics run has made some great progress in terms of LGBTQ2* representation and race and body type diversity while still centering music and taking its aesthetics from the '80s pop-punk scene, and this installment furthers that work. Comics in the Dimensions series include two short stories each, with the ultimate intention of showing Jem, the Holograms, the Misfits, and even a pretty well-developed set of groupies in a multi-dimensional way through extended world building and character development. Each story is written and drawn by a rotating crew, meaning that each comic contains two distinct story and art styles. This installment includes Sarah Kuhn and Siobhan Keenan’s “Face Off” and Sarah Winifrid Searle’s “Star Girl.”

Christopher Columbus was a despotic, homicidal a**hole. 

The time has come once again for us to celebrate the holidays in all of their glory. It's time to deck the halls, trim the tree, and create crazy monsters with magic and hunt them for sport! Well, that's the case if you live in Hole World. In this year's Curse Words Holiday Special, we get a look into the main cast, as the nine beings that worship the evil Sizzajee celebrate their favorite tradition: the Meatmeet, a special activity that shows these pretty bizarre beings doing a pretty bizarre things. Mostly, the Meatmeet is a competition for Sizzajee's favor, as the nine beings (which are the ones who have come after our beloved Wizord in our world) create a creature, imbue it with magic, and hunt it down, with the winner getting respect from Sizzajee and a special seat at the table during the celebration.

If you can't beat 'em...

In a dystopian future where most of the Earth is covered in water and the debris of a long-forgotten time, there are two worlds: the Noble Houses who live on dry land and the Chasing Arrows who live under the sea.  The Chasing Arrows are responsible for recycling all of the old plastic and other refuse that takes up most of the ocean.  Metal and other precious commodities go to the Noble Houses while the rest is used to power the old, massive ships now reconfigured as habitats for the Arrows. In essence, they are salvagers. They also manufacture their own food by farming plankton and sea fungus which, apparently, is not very tasty.

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