Time Corps is a time-traveling comic book series concerning the titular Time Corps: a ragtag group of individuals plucked from various moments of time right before they were supposed to die but now are assembled under the unifying cause of keeping history unchanged by other forces. The particular group focused on in Time Corps is the crew stationed in Venice Beach in what appears to be the present period and includes Gaius Equitus Brutus (Roman centurion who adds a neo-peplum element to the story), Smoke Jaguar (a Mayan ball player), Garabaldi Dilvorno (Prohibition-era gigolo), and Paulina Popova (Russian spy during Czarist Russia). 

Issue twelve of Time Corps focuses on the behind-the-scenes bureaucracy, red tape, and grabs for power occurring at the Celestial Bureaucracy, the overseeing organization of the Time Corps. The Inspector General and Grunfeld are at odds with each other, each running clandestine operations in conflict in the year 2657. Meanwhile, the famous Mata Hari, during a respite in an amorous encounter, is sucked out of a spaceship and into the offices of Celestial Bureaucracy. In the distant future of 3114, a technophile named Mallory takes umbrage to the dealings of the Time Corps and begins assembling her own time machine to stymie them.

“And whenever my mother or anyone else well-meaning asks me why I spend so much time in a darkened room, staring at a glowing screen, I answer with a question of my own: Why do you live one life?  As in: Why be content with one life when you could live one thousand and ninety-five?  A few of them are bound to be more interesting that your own.  Or in my case: most of them.”  - Chapter 1, This Book Is Not Yet Rated

The first thing you need to know about Samantha Spinner and the Spectacular Specs is that it’s, in fact, a sequel to another book. The second thing you need to know is that the plot synopsis on the inside flap of the book is almost entirely describing the first book, Samantha Spinner and the Super-Secret Plans, rather than the book you’re currently holding. In fact, even what the synopsis does say about the second book still happened in the first one to lay the groundwork for the sequel.

The great thing about adapting American Gods into a show is that the medium allows the showrunners to spend time and further develop the story.  Episode 4, “The Greatest Story Ever Told,” had the freedom to explore the previously untold story of the Technical Boy's origin.

Visitations #4: Victrola of Doom, Scott Larson’s latest installment in his comic tribute to old Chicago, returns to a slightly lighter tone than the previous issue.  It’s still darker than previous events such as the balloon race, but there aren’t as many heartbreaking societal issues in the foreground of the plot. (It may be a commentary on myself that I find murder less traumatic than sex trafficking.)  At the center of the story is the titular Victrola which allegedly has a demon locked inside that will kill anyone who uses it to listen to a record. Given the main story is presented as a radio drama on vinyl being played for readers/the characters in the frame story, are we safe from the curse? It’s up to you to decide.

It’s World War II in the world of Black Hammer, and Jeff Lemire has given his creation over to some of the best creators in the industry to convey a story that takes some inspiration from the Tuskegee Airmen.

Kathy Sartori has been through a lot: murdered in the 1960s, coming back 50 years later, discovering that there’s a version of her out there who wasn’t murdered and who lived a full life in her absence—and then seeing that version of herself get murdered, as well. It’s a strange situation to be sure.

From the very beginning, this comic has taken us on a variety of different adventures through a myriad of different worlds. At times, it can seem confusing, even chaotic, but it is, in fact, all connected. Whether you know what’s going on or not in that particular moment, it’s always a fantastic ride.

Solo: A Star Wars Story lands in a weird place in the Star Wars legacy. It isn't nearly as divisive as The Last Jedi or as generally crowd pleasing as The Empire Strikes Back. Solo is the first Star Wars movie to just slip under the radar which is a shame, because Solo is a great movie. It has its flaws, but so does every Star Wars movie. I was honestly surprised to see Star Wars: Solo the graphic novel adaptation pop up. I assumed the movie would be all but forgotten after its less-than-stellar box office debut.

If, like me, you lurk on the various social media outlets of the world, you've probably encountered Sarah Graley's Our Super Adventure at least once. It fits squarely in the emerging genre of shareable webcomics. I'd probably read half the comics in this collection before it even came ou,t but that didn't stop me from picking up Our Super Adventure: Press Start to Begin.

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