Last month, I feel as if I was writing about the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles all the time!  Between TMNT Ongoing, TMNT Universe, and TMNT Dimension X, I want to say I wrote about my favorite mutant superheroes (Are the any other mutant superheroes, though?) every week for more than the month of August.  But September has been quite extinct of New York’s only pizza-loving reptiles. 

Reading the first issue of Glitterbomb: The Fame Game inspired me to immediately buy the first volume on ComiXology and read it before writing this review. It’s a really good and surprisingly powerful read.

You read about cartels. You read about the violence and murder that exists south of our border. It sounds scary, frightening, and unimaginable. I know people whose family members went on vacation and simply didn’t come back alive. A location scout on Narcos was just found dead, riddled with bullets, sitting in their car. These little glimpses we see are a part of a much bigger problem that the innocent people of Mexico face and it's unreal. Mexico is not a war-torn country in the traditional sense, nor is it headed by religious extremists like places in the Middle East who want to start a war; however, a war has been raging there for some time. Sean Mackiewicz (writer) and Niko Walters (artist) use this landscape as a jumping-off point for a horror story that in their words, “ . . . is an attempt to process real-world horror, centuries of it, magnify it through genre, and learn from it.” They also say, “Gasolina is a story about Mexico. It’s about how countries impact each other. The war that’s about to erupt in these pages is a global one.” Those are some ambitious comments…and I like ambition in storytelling.

Simon Spurrier wrote one of my favorite comics this previous year: The Spire, a fantasy allegory about inequality among race and privilege. His new story, Angelic, immediately had me laughing a heavy “WTF.” In what appears to be a post-human world, oceans have overflown into cities, jungle canopies hang from skyscrapers, and primates have formed a civilization based on a religious belief system that we as readers can see is completely absurd.

Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox is quite possibly one of the greatest DC animated films ever created. So, when it was announced that The Flash television series (CW) would explore the concept in Season 3, a resounding cheer echoed from DC fans everywhere. Just before they had that collective, “Oh, crap, what now?” tension creep into their brains.

After spending the last week binging Supergirl Season 2, my head is swimming with thoughts and emotions about the second year of this show. The short review is: It’s fantastic. If you like Arrow or The Flash, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl. If you like engaging characters, dynamics, and good romances with pretty people, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl. If you liked Wonder Woman and want to see more optimistic superheroines, you can’t go wrong watching Supergirl.

Samurai Jack Quantum Jack #1 is a strange compilation of Samurai Jack and Quantum Leap. In some way, it's like the original television series, and in some ways, it isn't. For readers, that might not be a bad thing. Similarly to the show, there is not so much dialogue used. Fabian Rangel Jr. and Warwick Johnson-Cadwell are certainly looking toward the art telling much of the story, which comics can do quite well in such a framework. In this sort of tale, Samurai Jack is taken out of his normal timeline and placed in alternate realities. It's an interesting notion of taking Jack away from his usual plain of existence and into something completely different.



Robert Payne Cabeen has had a creative career penning subversive poetry and screenplays, such as Tainted Treats, the screenplay for Heavy Metal 2000, and Fearworms: Selected Poems from Fanbase Press. Cold Cuts marks Cabeen’s first foray into writing a novel, and much in alignment with his works, it’s both fiendish and funny.



With Star Wars: The Last Jedi about to hit theaters in only a few short months, Star Wars: The Force Awakens has been reappearing all over the place.  From Force Friday to personalized Apple Store sessions, everyone wants a piece of the franchise from a galaxy far, far away.  That includes IDW Publishing’s latest comic book series, Star Wars Adventures.

A big part of how and why Dept.H works is due to the fact that Matt Kindt knows where to place the focus for tension and suspense and when. He juggles a lot of balls all at once, which means that while story elements are being slowly revealed, our main characters are always on the edge of death due to various circumstances, decisions, or strokes of bad luck. When you’re 6 miles beneath the surface of the ocean on a lab that’s quickly crumbling with giant-sized, deadly exotic animals in the nearby waters, possible terrorists on board, and a killer or killers trying to stay alive right alongside you, you don’t get a moment to breath. Issue #18 puts our hero, Mia, and the remaining survivors in probably the most difficult position they’ve been in, and it’s nail biting.

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