Mia, a scientist who has been to space looking for new life with her father, is now deep under the ocean trying to figure out who killed him. The problem is that there are more than a handful of possible suspects, all trying their best to help Mia survive on the underwater station as it literally falls apart around them, but which is trying to stop her from solving the murder.

Sometimes, it takes a fresh perspective to start knocking on new doors, and other times, it helps to step away from a problem for awhile and come back to it. Our vanished superhero team, stuck in the small town of Rockwood, hasn’t done much of the latter. They’ve been living and thinking in the mire of their situation for some time now. For each, it has had a different effect. Now, the daughter of the character who owes the book its title, Black Hammer, has found her way to Rockwood in search of him. She not only represents that fresh perspective, but a journalistic one, as well. She begins digging, and with answers come more questions, some seemingly small, and some very big.

Briggs Land is a raging thunderstorm, and the characters contained inside, particularly main character Grace Briggs, are lightning bolts – and you never know when a powerful strike will take place.

For the last year or two, Dark Horse has been publishing a comic called The Rook which is, in my opinion, everything a good time travel story should be; however, as it turns out, like several of my favorite Dark Horse titles, this one is actually a reboot of a classic comic from back in the day. Furthermore, as they often do, they’ve now begun reprinting the original comics to coincide with the reboot.

In the last near-decade, Jamie McKelvie and Kieron Gillen made their mark on the world of comics in a big way with their hit series, Phonogram. After reading over 500 pages of the completed collection of the series, I realized two things: It's one of the most British things I've ever read, and it's also one of the most brilliant. Collecting the three major arcs (19 issues, along with some shorter pieces within the universe), The Complete Phonogram lives up to the hype the series has garnered as one of the most iconic series in recent history. With that being said, let's start the show.

The end of “Imperial Phase (Part One)” is here, and with it comes one hell of a party.  This is a pretty stark contrast to the way the rest of this arc has gone, with most of it being a bit more dour, what with this whole “Great Darkness” thing coming, and all of the Gods being a bit more divided on the whole subject, and each other.

Like most mothers, Linda Anderson isn’t perfect. She’s made more than a few bad calls in her life: She married a thief, started taking drugs when he passed away, and didn’t look after her son Hunter as well as she could have. But she’s been on the straight and narrow for a long time now, trying to make an honest living. Her son hasn’t.

Titan Comics released the first of two issues of Dark Souls: Tales of Ember earlier this month. Based on the video game developed by FromSoftware, Inc. and produced by Bandai Namco Entertainment, this issue collects three stories bookended by an intro and outro. The anthology expands on the lore of Lordan and Dragleic under the editorial guidance of Tom Williams (Dark Souls: Legends of the Flame) and Wilfried Tshikana-Ekutshu as the series designer. Lettering for the issue is provided by Williams and Michael Walsh (Hawkeye; King Warlock and Blue Bird).

In its latest Main Stage performance, LA-based theatre company Theatre Unleashed (TU) presents a beautifully crafted production of John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men, illustrating humanity's continued struggle for connection, empathy, and compassion as we maneuver through life's experiences.  Calling upon Steinbeck's classic tale of loneliness, hardship, and social stigma, Theatre Unleashed delivers a production that is poignant in its timeliness and necessary to our society's ongoing conversation of inclusion, understanding, and equality.  Through Of Mice and Men, audiences will no doubt be in awe of the company's endless talent and creative energy while walking away with a renewed desire for embracing goodwill and sensitivity.

Charles "Chuck" Higgins was at the wrong place at the wrong time when he bumped into an inebriated space traveler named Joppenslik "Jopp" Wenslode. Quickly captured by the Prime Partners Intergalactic Consortium, Chuck and Jopp are forced to work together, hauling cargo between space destinations. Their friendship is solidified when Haaga Viim and his crew of mercenary space pirates attack Jopp and Chuck’s cargo ship, causing them to crash on an outpost planet. The madcap adventure takes off from there, and after some plot twists and red herrings, the pair solve their crisis.

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