A little over two years ago, I began writing for Fanbase Press.  At the time, we were still called Fanboy Comics, but here I am, 96 reviews (This marks my 97th.) and 11 editorials later, and I couldn’t be prouder of both myself and the entire Fanbase team. 

One of the most interesting series out there has added another issue to their story with the release of Cryptocracy #3. The story of the nine families that secretly rule the world has been a unique experience to read thus far,  especially given that it’s taken on a completely different plot than I expected.

Dark Horse Comics makes damn good comics based on the Aliens franchise, and they’ve been doing it for some time now (all they way since 1988). Their newest miniseries, Aliens: Life and Death, by writer Dan Abnett and artist Moritat does nothing to change this trend of excellence and brings all the required elements to the table in order to attract fans: bullets, beasties, badasses, and blood... a whole lot of blood...

What would you do if you discovered you couldn’t die? What would you do if you couldn’t die, but had nothing left to live for? What would you do if you couldn’t die, but could still get hurt really, really badly?

Technology is madness.

I’m really not sure how to classify Jeremy Thompson’s novel, Let's Destroy Investutech.  There are equal parts of romance, techno-thriller, eldritch horror, and a myriad of other styles crammed into his narrative.  Beginning with several short stories that have little to do with one another at first, we’re given many pieces of a world that is at once familiar and alien to us, one where technological marvels are the focus of each vignette.  We see the overreach of callous masterminds pushing the advancement of things they don’t fully understand intellectually or morally and the uniformly terrible events that result.  Once the main narrative begins, there is a weaving in of what came in the shorter stories, but not all at once. Rather, they’re feathered in as we go along.

This week marks the release of Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 10 #30 from Dark Horse Comics, as well as the culmination of the tenth season of Buffy and its third season taking place in the comic book medium. The Buffy franchise has clearly thrived in the world of sequential art and word balloons, and the skilled and talented creative team of writer Christos Gage and artist Rebekah Isaacs have fostered that success, bringing the current season to a close with finesse and many “feels.” Now, in the afterglow of latest Buffy season finale, it is time for us fans to reflect on the merits and missteps of Buffy: Season 10 and look forward to where our favorite Slayer is headed.

What do process servers who serve superheroes and villains do in their downtime? In the comic series Serving Supes, apparently, find themselves in more trouble—and love it.

Each month, Fanbase Press Contributor Joshua Desjardins (a.k.a. Stagedork83) receives new and exciting subscription boxes from Marvel Collector Corps, and the Fanbase Press readers have a chance to live vicariously through the deliveries as he captures the thrilling unboxing process on video!

This month, in Marvel Collector Corps’ August subscription box, the web-slinger himself, The Amazing Spider-Man, finds his way into the home of Fanbase Press contributor Joshua Desjardins (a.k.a. @Stagedork83) who unboxes all sorts of goodies inside.  From baseball caps to giant-sized Fabrikation plushies, as always, Funko does a great job supplying this all-exclusive every other month subscription service.  If you’re not a part of Marvel Collector Corps, watch this video to see what you’re missing out on!

To describe the plot of Cry Havoc makes it sound like the kind of story you’ve heard a hundred times before. Lou is an ordinary English woman who’s bitten by a werewolf, causing her to gain extraordinary abilities and a terrifying dark side to her personality. She’s then recruited by the U.S. Army into an elite group of others with strange and extraordinary abilities who are tasked with Lynn Odell, formerly one of their ranks who has now gone rogue—and who is also a werewolf. The plot, laid out in that way, seems fairly standard, the sort of thing you’ve read in a dozen other comics just like this. Only the story of Cry Havoc is anything but standard, and you definitely haven’t read anything like this.

In one of the more touching blocks at this year's HollyShorts, this selection of films focused on films made by members of the disabled community. It's a beautiful look at some of the members of this community and the wonderfully creative spirits they have as artists.

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