Looking for something directed more for the adults in the room? Something erotic, steamy, and a bit twisted? Then, Brian Azzarello and Maria Llovet bring to you Faithless. Faith is a 20-something who hangs out at coffee shops and studies occult stuff, spells, witchcraft – the usual. She also can’t get off when pleasuring herself. So, what is the issue? At this point, it’s hard to say, because while this first issue is about Faith, it’s more about Faith meeting Poppy.

I’m a few issues behind on my reviews for The Empty Man, and it’s been a pretty intense chase scene these last few issues as the world has fallen into chaos.

The first issue of Ronin Island steamrolled forward, introducing several major story elements in a jam-packed issue. Story beats came so furiously that it was difficult at times to keep your footing.

I’ve been waiting expectantly for this new story arc for months, and I don’t know if I was prepared enough going into it. The first issue of She Could Fly: The Lost Pilot left me rattled in the best possible way.

Dark Horse Comics is well known for its interesting catalog of titles. While their catalog often contains licensed comics, they also take chances on epic, new creator-owned series, including She Could Fly, a series by Christopher Cantwell, co-creator of the hit show, Halt and Catch Fire.

Time Corps is a time-traveling comic book series concerning the titular Time Corps: a ragtag group of individuals plucked from various moments of time right before they were supposed to die but now are assembled under the unifying cause of keeping history unchanged by other forces. The particular group focused on in Time Corps is the crew stationed in Venice Beach in what appears to be the present period and includes Gaius Equitus Brutus (Roman centurion who adds a neo-peplum element to the story), Smoke Jaguar (a Mayan ball player), Garabaldi Dilvorno (Prohibition-era gigolo), and Paulina Popova (Russian spy during Czarist Russia). 

Issue twelve of Time Corps focuses on the behind-the-scenes bureaucracy, red tape, and grabs for power occurring at the Celestial Bureaucracy, the overseeing organization of the Time Corps. The Inspector General and Grunfeld are at odds with each other, each running clandestine operations in conflict in the year 2657. Meanwhile, the famous Mata Hari, during a respite in an amorous encounter, is sucked out of a spaceship and into the offices of Celestial Bureaucracy. In the distant future of 3114, a technophile named Mallory takes umbrage to the dealings of the Time Corps and begins assembling her own time machine to stymie them.

“And whenever my mother or anyone else well-meaning asks me why I spend so much time in a darkened room, staring at a glowing screen, I answer with a question of my own: Why do you live one life?  As in: Why be content with one life when you could live one thousand and ninety-five?  A few of them are bound to be more interesting that your own.  Or in my case: most of them.”  - Chapter 1, This Book Is Not Yet Rated

The first thing you need to know about Samantha Spinner and the Spectacular Specs is that it’s, in fact, a sequel to another book. The second thing you need to know is that the plot synopsis on the inside flap of the book is almost entirely describing the first book, Samantha Spinner and the Super-Secret Plans, rather than the book you’re currently holding. In fact, even what the synopsis does say about the second book still happened in the first one to lay the groundwork for the sequel.

The great thing about adapting American Gods into a show is that the medium allows the showrunners to spend time and further develop the story.  Episode 4, “The Greatest Story Ever Told,” had the freedom to explore the previously untold story of the Technical Boy's origin.

Visitations #4: Victrola of Doom, Scott Larson’s latest installment in his comic tribute to old Chicago, returns to a slightly lighter tone than the previous issue.  It’s still darker than previous events such as the balloon race, but there aren’t as many heartbreaking societal issues in the foreground of the plot. (It may be a commentary on myself that I find murder less traumatic than sex trafficking.)  At the center of the story is the titular Victrola which allegedly has a demon locked inside that will kill anyone who uses it to listen to a record. Given the main story is presented as a radio drama on vinyl being played for readers/the characters in the frame story, are we safe from the curse? It’s up to you to decide.

Page 2 of 105
Go to top