For Jeff Lemire, the world of Black Hammer is an open canvas. He wants to write a Punisher comic but doesn’t want to work for Marvel? So, he writes Skulldigger and Skeleton Boy. With his spin-off series, Lemire has explored everything from the Golden Age of superheroes in Spiral City to future sci-fi worlds, the multi-verse, the WWII era, to the present day. Skulldigger is about as close to present day as we can get.

The main premise of Anderson Cowan’s debut feature film, Groupers, sounds simple: Psychology grad student Meg kidnaps two barhopping young men (Brad and Dylan) to use as subjects for her thesis experiment on whether homosexuality is a choice.  As the plot unfolds, it becomes clear that there is much more at stake than a simple test, and as Meg’s careful plan spirals out of control, the only constant is that homophobia is so totally ridiculous.

This jumbo-sized issue picks up immediately after Firefly #12. The Second Unification War is over with minimal casualties on both sides, thanks to Mal and his crew. Ma Reynolds is still at large, and Mal gave himself up so that his friends could skedaddle. Due to his heroics in the Second Unification War, Mal is granted a conditional pardon. The provision: He brings his mother to justice.

Previously, on Buffy Kendra the Vampire Slayer: Kendra’s timely arrival saved Rose and Cordy from the vicious attack of a classmate with some serious Hellmouth-inspired female hate. None of the menfolk seem to be immune to the Hellmouth’s influence, which could prove to be a serious problem for the new Slayer.  

Vampires, vampires, vampires. Everyone loves vampires, and this comic book series is not an exception.   But unlike the sexy heart-throb glittering types, here, we get the dredges of the universe who were created to serve a higher purpose. In short, it means these vampires are expendable.  

Over the past four decades, there have been hundreds of non-fiction books written about all aspects of Star Wars: making-of stories, behind-the-scenes accounts, scholarly analyses, picture books, encyclopedias, biographies, and so on. While this gives the impression that everything that could possibly be said about Star Wars has been said, there’s always a new text that shines a new light or perspective on the beloved franchise.

In the world of science fiction comics, there are few creative teams that seem to do as much research and put as much effort into the accuracy of their work as Matt Hawkins. In his prior series, he's tackled the worlds of military weapons design and research and even designed utopias; each time, he not only gave readers an in-depth look into the fictional world through the lens of his characters, but through the additional "backmatter" included in his series, dubbed “Science Class.” The amount of content generated by Hawkins in the past several years is incredible, since he not only publishes his work through the Top Cow imprint of Image Comics, but he also runs the company as its president. Such a busy life could seemingly lead to little free time, but Hawkins' new series, The Clock, looks at the incredibly dangerous and deadly disease that is cancer for a fascinating, yet terrifying, new tale.

To try and describe all of the intricacies, twists, and turns of one of the best comic book series currently running would be to destroy the experience of living with it as I have. Gideon Falls is about an ancient, evil entity that has breached our world (from where I will not say, and the four characters that have gotten sucked up into the fight against it. That’s the most straight forward way to put it, but it hardly does justice to the deep-seated lore at the center of this psychological horror story, and the discoveries the reader makes on both a world-building and emotional level along with these characters.

To put it frankly, Black Stars Above is one of the most intimate comic books I have read in 2019.  The series is about a fur trapper (Eulalie Dubois) that leaves the burden that her family places upon her to find herself by wandering into the wilderness during a wintered cosmic hazard in 1887. Our protagonist Eulalie Dubois has left the confines of her family’s fur trapping business to deliver a parcel to an unknown town in the northern wilderness. Unbeknownst to her, there is a darkness enamored with what she holds.

This book wasn’t at all what I expected. The term “graphic biography” made me think it would be an account of Elvis’ life, told in graphic novel form, perhaps similarly to the way The Fifth Beatle chronicled the life of Brian Epstein and the rise of the titular band. Instead, what we’re given is a fairly standard biography, chronicling the highlights of Elvis’ life and career, alongside drawings of him and the people from his life.

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