Tie-in comics are generally kind of hit or miss, and that especially goes when they're tied to video games, a medium that generally allows for so much more expansive lore than any other medium can give. That goes even more so for games like the Mass Effect franchise, which is a huge, expansive universe that the games only scratch the surface of, in most single titles. As the video game series has gone on, we've learned a great deal, and that is usually gained through huge, eighty-hour playthroughs that take us on massive and beautiful journeys.

Gwen Hensley thought her arrival in the small Kansas town would bring hope and the comfort of family, but something dark from her family’s past tracked her grandmother, Lizzy, down and murdered her before the young woman and her raven familiar, Lewis, arrived.  The young woman must come to grips with her loss, a new environment, burgeoning magical abilities, and the truth of why her mother ran from home, but can Gwen really survive the knowledge of betrayals and twisted bonds?

Ziyi’s brilliant plan to spirit herself and Oh out of the underworld brings the pair back to earth at a funerary offerings stall in a busy marketplace, startling everyone present!  Fortunately, the man recognizes the renowned exorcist and sets the pair on a path to a nearby valley where evil lurks.  Maybe the answer to Oh’s crazy trek to the land of the dead can be found in a creepy, mostly abandoned locale?  

As another arc of The Wicked + The Divine passes, we are once again gifted a look into the past with another one-shot. This time, we turn to Rome, as the creative team takes a new view into the history of the once and now great civilization, this time focusing more on one of our less-attended-to Gods, Lucifer. While their passing in the main story was something both fans and the characters themselves still feel, getting a chance to give Lucifer the spotlight is a great way to still showcase the skills of the mischievous deity.

When the going gets tough, smack the ever-loving snot out of it.

From the animated Sword in the Stone (1963) to John Boorman’s Excalibur (1981), from Antoine Fuqua’s King Arthur (2004) to Starz’s Camelot (2011), and not even including the various comics, books, video games, short stories, and other texts, Arthurian tales have enjoyed incredible longevity via adaptations and re-imaginings. It’s a genre that seems immune to accusations of unoriginality in Hollywood, which is cyclically plagued with remakes, sequels, and prequels. The mythology is so epic and timeless, yet so well known and open to playful reworkings, that each new iteration adds something to the legend, truly making it a dynamic mythology.

“Head Full of Snow” does not begin the same way as the previous two episodes of American Gods.  Instead of the prologue revolving around how a particular god came to America, it focuses on a present-day story of Egyptian gods Anubis and Bast ushering a woman into the afterlife.

I’m so used to comic book series going on for at least a couple of years, so it took me by surprise that this issue was the conclusion of Dead Inside. John Arcudi has forced his main character, Detective Caruso, into a situation in which it has to conclude or there will be consequences, and Caruso has positioned herself as the only one who can get it done. Or I should say, Arcudi has put her into this position by making most all of the other officers hot-headed idiots. How Caruso gets out of her predicament - while she promises she’s the only one that can do it with her intelligence - isn’t particularly that creative or even well thought out. It’s level-headed simplicity that wins in the end, which one can argue is missing from law enforcement these days.

The compelling story of Star Wars in 1977 left fans wanting more. Unlike now, where we can own a copy of a much-loved film and watch any time we want, back in the late 1970s, Beta and VHS formats were still a few years from being an available commodity. There were a handful of novels that were released at the time, and Marvel was putting out a monthly comic book series, but the fans’ interest was not sated. They were clamoring for more content. Given that the sequel, The Empire Strikes Back, would not be released until May 1980, the Los Angeles Times Syndicate began running a daily Star Wars comic strip on March 11, 1979. Finally, fans could get a daily installment, albeit in very small doses, for the next five years.

“Oxygen” may appear to be a standalone episode; however, if my theory is correct, then this may be a major piece to set up the arc for Series 10.

Page 2 of 39
Go to top