It’s hard to say what one would do if they were given the worst possible two choices: kill or be killed. Most might swear they’d take the moral high road, resolving never to touch a hair on another’s head. But, when it comes down to it, down to the nitty gritty of survival, would they break to live just one more month?

“Eventually, we started coming across ruins.  Ancient, dilapidated structures once inhabited by Pre-Rising humanity.  They were an inescapable part of any Wasteland Journey. Most Recon and Extermination rangers cut their teeth on these particular ruins, looking for mutant stragglers or bandits hoping to intercept Remnant convoys.  These structures, which included everything from gas stations to schools, were a missed sight.  Most were half-collapsed at best.  Others were eerily perfect, as if their owners had just stepped out for the night.  Driving past them was always a sobering experience, however.  Everywhere were reminders of the days when humanity had been great and powerful.”

This season continues to take risks with parallel dimensional travel, complicating opportunities for the audience to understand how it works, who has the ability, and how it can affect other worlds. As Tagomi (Cary Hiroyuki Tagawa) watches a video of the H-bomb test in alternate America, it is clear that complete devastation is possible in both versions of the world. Is one world actually any safer than the other? It doesn’t seem like global peace is truly achievable anywhere. Tagomi’s dimension hopping is complicated further in this episode, as he is able to bring the film from alternate America back to the show’s main reality. Perhaps, then, the man in the high castle is able to move through different Earths, as well, which could explain how he acquired his stacks of films. Hitler, too, had been collecting films. If Hitler were a dimension hopper, then he would have been able to gain useful information, making it possible to defeat the Allies in this version of reality’s World War II. He also could potentially have seen footage of the future, giving him a huge advantage. With all these possibilities, it seems as though both time and space can be manipulated.

Why do I enjoy the Tomb Raider franchise so much?  After this weekend’s Women’s March for Equality—the largest protest in the history of these United States—I am reminded that now, more than ever, we need strong female role models in our lives.  Whether these female inspirations come from our own families, popular and honest celebrities (cough, Meryl Streep, cough!), or even the characters we see in films and on TV, there are already many women we can choose to follow.  For me, Lara Croft is one of them.

Brian Wood is a heck of a craftsman when it comes to comic book writing, so I was overjoyed to see his name on the cover of an Aliens comic nine months ago. I didn’t get around to reading it at the time, but was salivating at the mouth to dig into the first collection.

Hold on, Dorothy. Kansas is going bye-bye.

For nearly thirty years, the name Slayer has been synonymous with some of the most controversial and brilliant heavy metal to ever exist. As a pioneer of thrash metal, the group has cause plenty of ruckus, both positive and negative. But there's no denying the impact they've had on the world, and now they're looking to expand their influence with the release of their first comic book series, Repentless.

Previously on Masked – we find our central character, Frank Braffort, recovering from what can best be described as an explosive transformation. Self-creating anomalies have been popping up all throughout the city, and he has some kind of connection to them. Despite finding himself in a cavern at the source of these anomalies, and having a massive surge of power rush through him bursting into the night sky, the reasons linking them together are yet to be identified. If you want to catch up a little more on this series before continuing, please check out reviews for issues one and two.

Well, the new year is officially here, and the holidays have gone as quickly as they came . . . but not before our favorite heroes-in-a-half-shell threw themselves a well-deserved holiday party. 

I’m not sure how I feel about this comic. On the one hand, the concept is rather an interesting one. It chronicles Biff Tannen’s rise to power and wealth in the alternate 1985. On the other hand… is that really something we need a comic about?

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