Occasionally, a comic makes you step away from it for a bit. You turn the last page, set the book down, and have to walk away. Maybe sleep on it. Mull it over while you shower. And then, you pick it up again and read it cover to cover. Aleister & Adolf is one of those books. It’s impossible to read it to the end and not want to comb through it again to pick up the pieces you missed. There are moments of genuine horror, revelations, and simply strange moments that are difficult to contextualize. Whether that makes the book good or not will vary wildly, but unlike most books, Aleister & Adolf will foster an internal debate, something most comics simply can’t do.

The fight against the Nine Families rages on with the release of Cryptocracy #5. While the last issue ended on the pretty heavy cliffhanger of the demise of Nick, the leader of the Mars family, with this issue, we get to see the consequences of that act.

*For mature readers only

I’ve never read Manara before now. I knew what to expect, but I had no idea what to expect. I certainly didn’t expect the absolute absurd lengths to which he would actually go. These aren’t just sexual exploits between characters with longing desires, but more like a jump down the rabbit hole into subversive oblivion through which some form of social commentary is arrived at. It is perverse erotic comedy. These stories play like creative daydreams of early sexual progressives.

Eisner and Harvey Awards recipient Roger Langridge brings readers an uplifting tale filled with imagination, humor, and sensibility. Abigail and the Snowman, trade paperback edition, showcases Langridge’s ability to craft an award-winning story alongside characters rich with sincerity and likeability.

Imagine shaking someone’s hand and suddenly the hand, as well as everything else connected, begins to melt like hot wax dripping from a candle. Well, Mycroft Holmes doesn’t have to imagine it whatsoever. He experiences this horrifying moment firsthand in the latest issue of The Apocalypse Handbook.

Whatever happened to Sunday night? Used to be a fanboy/fangirl could enjoy The Simpsons then The X-Files and, if feeling really kooky, maybe watch a late-night rerun of a ST: TNG episode.  Now, my goodness, Game of Thrones, The Walking Dead, Preacher, Fear the Walking Dead, Westworld, and Fox’s ongoing animation sort-of-domination have made Sunday a Tivo-filling night.  Add in John Oliver, and I’m swamped. [Note to self: Stephen Ogg appears in both The Walking Dead (Simon) and Westworld (Rebus) - crossover character?  Is he the thing that ties all of Sunday night’s narratives together?  Must watch to see if he shows up in GoT (looks a little Night Watch-y), Simpsons, or Preacher.]1

Innkeepers and karma are quick to collect debts.

After keeping his brother safe while insensate, Takeo is more than ready to get some answers from him while Akio himself is more interested in getting some fun in after having missed any earthly pleasures for a while.  Aided and abetted by the less-holy-than-thou monk, Akio manages to bull his way into a load of trouble and debt while Takeo finds himself wanting to spend time with a lovely young lady with whom he has more than a passing fancy.  Of course, all of this takes place in the slightly less romanticized version of Feudal Japan that creators Di Giorgio and Genet are playing in, so the stakes are very high, and terrible things are in store for anyone caught not paying attention or not possessing enough money to be considered worthwhile as a person.  So yeah, pretty much anyone.

BlackMagicWolf Productions and a campaign funded through Kickstarter bring a comic book brimming with what its audience paid for. Home is the epitome of good storytelling and well-colored artistry combining to reveal an instant hit.

Would you destroy the world to save your daughter? Or would you be willing to sacrifice her to save it? These and many other questions are the underlying themes in the series Snowfall, written by Joe Harris with art by Martín Morazzo.
In Issue #5, the White Wizard imprinted enough of the formulary onto Anthony Farrow to draw the Cooperative’s mercenaries into a trap, but the ensuing firefight leaves both him and the former student and terrorist injured. Still free and in control of the formulary, his daughter, Chloe, clearly has a different agenda and seeks out the detained Inspector Deal to help her.  Now, with snow falling on Old New York City for the first time in decades, who really controls the formulary?

It’s been some time since Dark Horse Comics’ last comic book canon continuation of Joss Whedon’s Serenity feature film, Serenity: Leaves on the Wind, allowed fans to rejoin Captain Mal Reynolds and company on board everyone’s favorite Firefly class spaceship, but, starting today, Browncoats everywhere get the chance to jump back on board with the release of the first issue of Serenity: No Power in the ‘Verse, written by iZombie co-creator Chris Roberson and illustrated, once again, by artist Georges Jeanty (Serenity: Leaves on the Wind, Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 8).

Page 96 of 111
Go to top