Brian Haberlin’s telling a story I’ve been looking for for years: science fiction full of exploration and discovery, grounded in a clear interest in real(ish) science, more about the ship, its crew, and the things they encounter than blowing up bad guys. I mean, there are bad guys, and existential threats, and action…but, like in the best eras of Star Trek, these are there to heighten the drama – obstacles to overcome. They raise the stakes. They aren’t the point. There’s an inherent optimism and exceptionalism to it (again, much like Star Trek, to which Haberlin makes overt references on numerous occasions), and when the majority of science fiction offerings in popular culture have been focused on deadly aliens and laser swords for a number of years, Faster Than Light feels like coming home again.

Well, the Cubbies were off by a year of winning the World Series according to Back to the Future, but at least they finally won!  In this day and age, however, you know director Robert Zemeckis and producer Steven Spielberg can release a special edition where Marty goes to the future of 2016 instead of 2015.

Forget everything you think you know.

So speaks the Ancient One to Mister...forgive me, Dr. Strange.  It's also a good reminder for the audience, as well, though judging by my theatre, everyone was ready for a new kind of trip.  Marvel's doing something hard, something almost more difficult than tossing RDJ into a powered suit and seeing what shakes out.  They have to build it again, but in a world where we already have so many pieces and a comfortable sense of what's happening.  The success and shine of Winter Soldier and Civil War have spoiled us with solidly continuing storylines that have built upon everything that came before, with Ant Man and Doctor Strange opening up new worlds (the Quantum Realm and, well, the entirety of the multiverse, respectively) that are harder to ground in reality.  The only current franchise that has attempted that has been Thor, and it's not an uncommon belief that those films tend to be the weakest of the offerings we've have over the last decade.  This is the ground that Marvel has to win to bring Infinity Wars to the screen, and, honestly, Phase 3 looks to be shaping up pretty well.

What would you and your high school classmates do if you, and your school building, were suddenly transported to an unknown world? What would you do if you were surrounded by a wilderness filled with terrifyingly grotesque creatures that want to devour your flesh?

Wow - that is a whopper of a second issue!  I was expecting something decent, but I wasn’t prepared for something that good.

David Leach is at it again!  Who is David Leach, you ask?  Why, just look at this review (by Yours Truly) to learn a little bit about him.  Anywho, though it might have taken him over two years to publish the next edition of Psycho Gran, this edition (volume 2!) does not disappoint.  For those of you who are really ready to watch some vigilantes kick the ever-loving crap out of some jerk on the street who has it coming, this comic is for you.

Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita
mi ritrovai per una selva oscura,   
ché la diritta via era smarrita.

The opening lines of Dante’s Inferno (which if you have not read, shame on you - go read it and then come back)1, which, roughly translates, “As I had wandered halfway through our life’s way, I found myself in a shadowed wood, for I had lost the straightforward path,” begins an epic journey that takes thirty-three cantos to work its way through nine levels of hell and a whole bunch of sublevels through the craziest landscape you will ever encounter.  Hell is full of the famous, the infamous, and the common.  Dante keeps fainting, but he keeps going because the woman he loves, Beatrice, sent the poet Virgil to guide him through.  Gotta keep going, Virgil reminds him.  But Dante, when he is not fainting, is also constantly stopping to chat with the residents of hell.

Super Terre.r is an out-of-this-world adventure that’s perfectly described by its cover page. Artist Bob Eggleton creates an extraterrestrial vision with several explorers standing in the midst of an alien planet; it’s made apparent by multiple moons or planets in the sea blue sky. The cover also highlights the abundance of foliage, as green moss covers every inch of tall towers, which are yet to be determined if they’re man-made or not.

The world has changed. The sun devastates the world instead of nourishes it. In a flash of sunlight, life can be extinguished, and the remnants are not a pretty sight.

Once again, a new arc of The Wicked + The Divine has begun, and with it comes one of the more interesting additions to the lore of the gods and their brief, but exciting, lifespans.

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