The Evil Within fans are having a great year. First, it was announced that we’ll finally see a second title in the ever-popular video game series. Then, they received an intermediary gift in the form of a two-issue comic book series to bridge the gap between games #1 and #2. As a follow-up to the first issue, The Evil Within: The Interlude #2 (Titan Comics) satisfies the fan in every possible way and prepares them for their return to STEM.

American Gods: Shadows #8 continues to encourage us to think about American land and the land’s relationship with people. By providing some history of settlement in America, the series asks how our history contributes to how we identify as American today. And then, of course, there’s the mythos factor that shapes the American identity, as well.

Dealing with the death of Lloegyr national, Endre/Brother Dominic opened Penny White’s small parish life to something greater than imagination: an entire fantastical world populated by beings considered mythological by residents of the human world; however, the intoxicating lure of the magical creates a divide between her mundane life as a small-town vicar and the comparative excitement of her new position as a religious liaison between the two worlds.  Can Penny figure out what is most important to her: the constant excitement of something new or the ties with those around her? Will she make it through yet another Christmas season with its parish demands?  And, most importantly, can her human suitor ever compete with the temptation of a riveting search dragon for her heart?

When characters die in a story, it’s not always clear what the resulting impact will be from the person’s absence. In Lifeformed: Cleo Makes Contact, it’s made clear that the main character will be dealing with an alien invasion “and her father’s death.” Dark Horse Books tells you up front in the synopsis, but it’s not enough. It still doesn’t prepare the reader for the shock that comes within those pages, and that translates to the story being told by writer Matt Mair Lowery and artist Cassie Anderson.

It’s been a long time since I’ve written about Gaga. Now that she has a new documentary out via Netflix, I certainly couldn’t let Mother Monster Down.

The War for the Planet of the Apes series has been an example with each issue of how a comic book should be written and drawn. While the comic certainly ties into the feature film that was released this summer, it stands on its own in many ways and in some ways surpasses the film series. Writer David Walker has a great command over Caesar and also the narrative as a whole. He portrays Caesar as a complex and multifaceted character that is as interesting to read about as any other character in the series; however, Jonas Scharf really brings the series to the next level with his artwork.

Over the last few years, creators James Tynion IV and Eryk Donovan have been delving into some Cronenberg-esque areas of horror with their series of comics that I’ll call the “-ic” series. Memetic and Cognetic were the first two series that delved into the downfall of the human race in equally terrifying ways. They were both strange and effective creations that I loved. Now, Eugenic, while still holding true to the terrifying horror elements of the previous books, is just as much about the rebirth of the human race as it is the destruction of it.

I've loved Sex Criminals since the very first issue. As a fan of Matt Fraction's work, and based on the mature but baffling concept of two people who meet, fall in love, and stop time when they climax, this seemed like a really fun series. And it is. Honestly, it's probably the funniest comic book on shelves right now.

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