Look.  I get it.  The world sucks right now. 

In Irrational Numbers #0: Addition (Wunderman Comics), readers were introduced to the world of Pythagoras and his student, Zalmoxis. They eventually meet Sofia and Medea, and in the closing pages of the graphic novel, Zalmoxis and the women become bound by vampyrism. Picking up with Irrational Numbers #1: Subtraction, writer Hannibal Tabu is back, and in this issue, the story opens in the mid 20th century after the conclusion of World War II.

The presence of mystical elements really shines in Issue #6, and the discussion about gods in America makes us think about the relationship that gods have with man and with the land. The gods have essentially immigrated to America and taken root in the land. They are outsiders but work to be productive on American soil. I’ve never thought of gods as national before. Wednesday’s discussion about the gods makes them seem more human than celestial, which creates some potential vulnerability. It also makes the gods seem more real and regular. They are like us, so perhaps we can understand them better.

Time for a vampire showdown. All of the plotting, secret meetings, and questioning of loyalties culminates in the final installment of Anno Dracula. The plot has been building to this moment, and we’ve been anxiously awaiting Dracula’s arrival. But along the way, the other characters have made for such an exciting and enjoyable adventure. Though it has existed on the backdrop, we have felt Dracula’s presence throughout the series while the other characters have driven the action. Kim Newman has created powerful, clever, and amusing personages of Victorian London. And each one is always ready for a fight.

Do you love military sci-fi? If yes, it’s not too late to come on board The Lost Fleet: Corsair.

secret history
noun
1. a version of historical events which differs from the official or commonly accepted record and purports to be the true version; Also called shadow history1

As I'm sure you know by now, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are in full swing with their travels to Dimension X. General Krang is on trial to be kept in jail for the rest of his days, but our heroes-in-a-half-shell must become heroes-of-the-universe as they venture to find the witnesses that will keep Krang behind bars. And with assassin Hakk-R following their every move, their mission is proving harder than expected.

Now I get it. TMNT has one of the most popular ongoing comic book storylines on the shelves, and it's no wonder that one could become confused by all of their separate mini-series and more.

Family reunions can be such a pain.

What's particularly notable about Clue and what separates it from the original movie is that it lets the audience in on the joke. This whole series is being manipulated by two people throughout the comic, and writer Paul Allor wants you to be completely aware of that. He's not interested in making the big reveal that the butler did it when half of the audience reading this comic probably is aware that is going to be the end. So, he is showing you right away that the butler, Upton, is indeed the likely culprit and is manipulating this entire story. But, he's not alone, and this is what changes things from the original film, where Mr. Boddy is simply a consequence of the plot. Here, he is indeed an important part of the book.



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