The comedic, Lovecraftian, buddy-cop series, Vinegar Teeth, continues into its second issue as Buckle and Vinegar Teeth continue about their police business in Brick City. The momentum at the end of issue one, with a super-powered cultist fleeing via the roof tops, is placed on hold in this issue with the focus shifting to more character development and lifestyle depictions. Buckle is shown to have a soft spot for a song called “Share that Nice Daydream.”  He initially relaxes to an LP of it in the bath until Vinegar Teeth accidentally blows up his apartment playing a tuba, and then moves to a bar to see a live performance of it. While on duty, Buckle and Vinegar Teeth are called to a bank robbery in progress being committed by a chapter of the Woodland Scouts (a Boy Scout parody). The scouts are able to get away by blowing up the bank with kerosene and firecrackers, but not before Vinegar Teeth saves Buckle.

Like a bucking bronco, Grass Kings #12 suddenly kicks! It’s an about-face shift in tone from the last few issues which were gradual and poetic. It made me wonder if I had missed reading an issue. This sudden shift has scattered the sheep. Characters that were on a specific trajectory have now been sent reeling in every other direction. You start poking around in the ash, and you’re bound to get the fire started again. I’m getting ahead of myself…

I love this book. To its very core. It’s a character-driven, science fiction adventure, high stakes coming-of-age story. I can see the trail of inspiration, the creative landmarks that carved a way through history to get here: Godzilla, Akira, Evangelion, and countless others. It feels of the same value, the same creative energies, but it never steals, and it never mirrors.

The best way to describe House of Demons is a collage of past, present, future, reality, surreal, imagined, and alternative timelines, all wrapped into one movie. All these things are woven together into a tapestry with horror as its backdrop. But, it is much more than just a horror movie. It’s a story of redemption and acceptance… should any of the characters find it while surviving a battle with demons.

A warrior’s path is a lonely one…

Hazel and Mari are each other’s one true love in a time when same-sex attraction is seen as repulsive, and even sinful. Torn apart by their families, they each find socially suitable partners (men), marry, have children and grandchildren, and build their careers. When they eventually reunite, they find their love has remained over time, and this time, they can’t let it go. Bingo Love is a tale of heartbreak, social change, and redemption.

Una Salus Victis Nullam Sperare Salutem!

Demons, gangsters, the 1930s: that’s Cullen Bunn’s The Damned in a nutshell.  While it has the world building and epic story arc that Bunn in known to imbue with most of his works, it also has the rhythm of a jazz band riffing at the top of their game.

Andy Kaufman was for real. He was born in 1949 New York City – a member of the baby boomer generation – and raised on a modern invention: the television. Rather than a passive receptacle of the programming he was watching, he ingested images of Mighty Mouse, Elvis Presley, and wrestling, and he was inspired. A natural showman and impersonator, he liked to entertain. The writing was on the wall for Kaufman: an entertainer in the making.

Page 89 of 152
Go to top