A quick recap of Angel #2: Issue #2 showed us a bit more of Angel’s dark past with Mara, the warrior he corrupted to his cause.  We also get an idea of the MO of Angel’s death squad: They’re harbingers of the apocalypse. In the present, after a conversation with Lilith, he’s clued into the new innocent that he has to protect. A fan favorite character is introduced in a different, but somewhat familiar, context. Spoiler alert: It’s Fred!

It's almost here. The finale of one of the most impressive comic book series of the modern era is upon us, with the release of the penultimate issue of The Wicked + The Divine. Over the last five years, we've seen the growth of this series from a well-known favorite to a true classic. The quality has always been there, but the consistency is what makes this book as amazing as it is. It's one thing to have a good few issues or maybe a great arc. But for forty-four issues, this series has been impressing readers over and over, giving us new twists to savor, new characters to love, and a new reason to keep reading with each successive issue. I've been covering this series for a long time, and what keeps me coming back to the series each time is what is likely the same as it is for many readers: It's really, really good.

Just when you thought the Predator was too ashamed to show his "ugly" face again, the intergalactic big game hunter is back again to terrorize the few remaining survivors of 2015's Archie vs. Predator (with writer Alex de Campi returning, backed by the art team of Robert Hack, Kelly Fitzpatrick, and Jack Morelli this time) from Dark Horse Comics. If you thought the last round between Arnie's extra-terrestrial buddy and the Riverdale gang was hilarious, disturbing, and off the wall... well, you ain't seen nothing yet!

Madeleine Holly-Rosing’s Boston Metaphysical Society series spans several other comics, some short stories, and even a novel. It’s a beautiful and intricate world, with a lot to take in. The Spirit of Rebellion is billed as a standalone story which you can enjoy without necessarily being familiar with the rest of the oeuvre. Technically, this is true. Anything you do need to know about the previous adventures is covered deftly in Holly-Rosing’s introduction.

Imagine being in a world where everyone around you is special and extraordinary, but you’re the odd one out for being ordinary. That’s what’s happening to Princess Basil, the seventh daughter of a king and queen who was blessed with being ordinary while her sisters were blessed with beauty, humor, and other special talents. Extraordinary, written and drawn by Cassie Anderson, is a story about a girl who isn’t “normal” and who seeks adventure, looking for purpose.

Quick recap: The Sundog crew is on the run, not just from the Lux Corp., but also the Renunciation, because of information they inadvertently uncovered about the secret relationship between the two organizations. Oh, and Vess, an Initiate of the Renunciation is onboard with corroborating information. Things aren’t looking all too great for the motley crew.

I spent the last hour catching up on Brian Wood’s Aliens saga, reading from Aliens: Defiance Volume 2 through Aliens: Resistance and now the first issue of Aliens: Rescue.

William Gibson’s Alien 3 answers a question I've had since I first saw Alien 3 on a dusty VHS. Alien and Aliens make up one of the greatest duologies of science fiction, but the original Alien 3 revealed the cracks in a franchise that has subsequently teetered between greatness and schlock. A few months ago, I learned that William Gibson had been called to write the screenplay in early drafts but was quickly dispatched from the project. His script was later revived and converted into the graphic novel we have today. I picked up this new (or old) iteration of Alien 3 to answer the question: "Could things have been different?"

“Wonderland.  But it’s very different from your “NeverLand.”

At long last, the final issue of Ghost Tree is nearing release. I've reviewed this series from beginning to end, and, looking back, I couldn’t be more glad that I did. Some comics exist purely for entertainment while others strive to become transformative in their medium. Ghost Tree sits comfortably in the latter column, alongside other comics I’ve reviewed such as A Girl in the Himalayas, Green River Killer, and Waves. It’s series like these that show what the comic book genre can truly do.

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