Following the events of Harbinger Wars #2, Amanda Mckee (a.k.a. Livewire) is now an enemy of the state. After choosing to protect other vulnerable psiots like herself, she plunged the entirety of the United States into a nationwide blackout using her technopathic abilities. Now, she is on the run from both the government and those she had chosen to protect.

At the end of my last review, I wrote “one more issue left” and made a comment that this wasn’t one of Cullen Bunn’s world-building efforts . . . I spoke to soon. Cold Spots #5 is a really nice way to wrap up this limited series before things get worse in what appears will be a much longer and more involved story.

I still really have no idea what exactly is going on in the military sci-fi action world of The Warning, only that from beginning to end, it’s such a well-plotted and visually mapped-out series with interconnected, non-linear events that I want to know what’s happening. If Edward Laroche can keep readers in the dark for two issues while at the same time keeping them intrigued, imagine what he can do when we actually know what’s happening.

In Gideon Falls, the characters circle each other like they’re caught in a water vortex, slowly being pulled towards a center that may be devastating for all involved. Like the gatekeeper and the key master, maybe it’s best that they never meet…but, boy, do we want them to. Every step that these characters take which brings them together, converging on the Black Barn - a supernatural distortion of time, space, and reality where a being called the Laughing Man inhabits - is a step that makes me want the next issue to come out sooner.

The first issue of Lightstep was fascinating but also a little off-putting in its depiction of a supposed Master Race built around eugenics and genocide. They were the villains of the story, of course, but even so, it was disconcerting to spend so much time and detail introducing them. This issue, on the other hand, is just as fascinating but also a whole lot more fun. This issue gives us space radio pirates.

Britannia: Lost Eagles of Rome is the third story arc which features the return of Rome’s first detective (referred to as “detector” in the story) Antonius Axia, an ex-military soldier who serves Emperor Nero.  The Valiant title has been described as “a combination of Batman meets Constantine set in the world of the Roman empire,” according to Bounding Into Comics’ John F. Trent (See “Valiant Comics Announces Britannia: Lost Eagles to Rome!” dated April 6, 2018.) but could also be termed a historical mystery.

What was fascinating about Bitter Root #1 was its ability to begin a story and weave together the stylistic feel of a Steampunk Harlem Renaissance with the issues of the present day. Bitter Root #2 continues that trend, picking up where we left off with Cullen and Berg battling a powerful, new Jinoo and protecting some civilians while a mysterious stranger mows down a KKK regiment who all turned to Jinoo themselves.

Comics, like any other media, suffer from an overdose of remakes, spinoffs, and sequels. If it isn't the juggernauts of Marvel and DC, then it's movie tie-ins, or TV tie-ins, and so on and so forth. That's why I sometimes go out of my way to pick up a comic purely because it doesn't appear to be related to any larger project. That's what motivated my decision to pick up Hex Vet: Witches in Training.

When I finished reading and reviewing Shards: Volume 1, I was eagerly ready for more content from the creators of In Hiatus Studios. Getting my hands on a digital copy of the second anthology was as exciting as my first read of Volume 1, and the wait was well worth it.

“We typically don’t know what we have until it’s lost” is a lesson that many of us heard growing up, and it’s one that Jack Boniface has to contend with in this issue of Shadowman. For years, he’s wanted to be rid of the Ioa, and in Issue #10, he is finally free from his curse, but everything always has a consequence of some sort.

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