Set shortly after “The Stolen Earth” and “Journey's End” during the David Tennant specials, this issue sees the Tenth Doctor visiting present-day New York City. While this is near the end of the Tenth Doctor's tenure, it still works as a starting point for those who are new to Doctor Who.

We’ll always have Santa Barbra . . .

My favorite show, Psych, ended its glorious, eight-year run in March. I had a funny feeling after Season 7 that they were getting ready for their final bow, but I didn’t want to admit it to myself. I’d almost pushed the thought out of my mind when I saw the announcement from stars James Roday and Dulé Hill, confirming my beliefs. I commend everyone involved for their decision, as much as it pains me to do. They didn’t let things drag out too long like a lot of series do. They felt it was time to move on.

The second episode of Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond had a much darker tone than the previous one, which does not come as too much of a surprise, since it takes place during World War II. Although, the war is not the only source of turmoil in Ian Fleming's life.

Psych is like a fresh pineapple on a hot, summer day. Cool, sweet, and refreshing. (I'm sure Shawn would say that a pineapple a day keeps the doctor away.) The show centers around Shawn Spencer (James Roday), a "psychic" consultant with the Santa Barbara Police Department and his best friend and reluctant partner Burton 'Gus' Guster (Dulé Hill) or Gee Buttersnaps, Squirts Macintosh, Ovaltine Jenkins, or whatever odd/hilarious name Shawn makes up for him. With Shawn's photographic memory, detective instincts, heightened observational skills, and charming personality, he's able to convince people that he's able to solve cases with psychic ability. "Oh, so it's The Mentalist?" C'mon, son! The Mentalist came out two years after Psych. Plus, Simon Baker wishes he had Shawn's exquisite hair.

If you’ve not heard of the BBC TV series Luther, do yourself a favor and Netflix the first two seasons and force your friends with satellite cable into having a Luther viewing party at their place for the third season, premiering September 3rd. If they don’t agree, they’re not really your friends, and you should look for new ones. Remember kids: friends don’t let friends miss Luther.

The moment Luther fans have been waiting for is finally here. DCI John Luther (the incomparable Idris Elba) is back to take down some of London’s most ruthless and vicious killers, anyway possible. By his side, taking out London’s trash, is his trusted partner-in-crime (solving), DS Justin Ripley (Warren Brown). Lutherans (a term I coined just now for fans of the show) will also be pleased to know that all four episodes of the third season (or series, for BBC fans) will be released over four sequential days. That’s right, four straight nights of Luther! Boosh!

Friends, Lutherans, Countrymen! Lend me your ears! Last night marked night number two of the four-night Luther marathon.  After everything that happened in the premiere, I was on pins and needles waiting to find out what happens next to London’s favorite gruff, but lovable, copper.  To say Luther has a lot on his plate would be the understatement of the century. He’s got a blossoming relationship with the lovely Mary Day, he’s working TWO cases for London’s Metro, one of which was handed to him, so that Internal Affairs can keep tabs on him. The other case is much more brutal and involves a creepy serial killer breaking into people’s homes and brutally murdering them, which may have connections to a string of murders throughout London years ago. Never fear, though, DCI John Luther is on the case.

Last night, Luther premiered its penultimate episode, and, boy, was it a heart pounder. After having nabbed the creepy, toothbrush-sucking serial killer Paul Ellis, Luther must now catch a sawed-off shotgun-wielding, vigilante serial killer (Elliott Cowan) who is using social media to drum up support for his cause. Now, Luther is in a race against the clock to stop him before he kills again. Things don’t start off so white-knuckled, though, as John is settling in to his relationship with Mary, a side of John we’ve rarely seen in the series. The moment where Ripley shows up at his door and John invites him in is one of the most endearing of the entire series in my opinion. It shows how far the two have come as partners over the years. It isn’t long before that moment is gone and things return to the roller-coaster ride of emotion we’re used to in Luther.

This is it. Luther is over. No more tweed jacket. No more blood red tie. No more villains that make your skin crawl. At least until they do a Luther movie. I hope they do. If it’s ever announced, I will be camped out like a Star Wars fan in anticipation of The Phantom Menace, but without the disappointment of finding out that midichlorians are what make Luther such a good detective.

 

DW S7E14Series 7 has come to a close, and, overall, it has been one of the weaker seasons since the reboot. The conclusion of the series was “The Name of the Doctor,” and despite how disjointed this past year has been, it was one of Steven Moffat's better finales.

MAJOR SPOILERS BELOW

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