It is no secret that I do not typically like episodes written by Mark Gatiss, so it came as a great surprise how much I enjoyed “Robot of Sherwood.”  It felt like a throwback to classic Doctor Who and was just an all-around fun episode.

SPOILERS BELOW

While “Into the Dalek” was by no means perfect, it was far better than the previous episode.  In this episode, we got to see a bit more of what the Twelfth Doctor will be like, and we also got the addition of a new cast member.

Do not hold your breath for “Deep Breath.”  Series 8 of Doctor Who has begun, and it is off to a mediocre start. Peter Capaldi deserved a better outing for his first full debut, and, more importantly, we, as the audience, did as well.

SPOILERS BELOW

It can be difficult to replicate an actor's voice in a comic book, but writer Nick Abadzis has been doing a great job capturing David Tennant's frenetic and wordy cadence in Titan Comics' Doctor Who: The Tenth Doctor.

This issue takes place between Series 5 and 6 of Doctor Who; however, it works as a great point for new Whovians to jump in.

Set shortly after “The Stolen Earth” and “Journey's End” during the David Tennant specials, this issue sees the Tenth Doctor visiting present-day New York City. While this is near the end of the Tenth Doctor's tenure, it still works as a starting point for those who are new to Doctor Who.

We’ll always have Santa Barbra . . .

My favorite show, Psych, ended its glorious, eight-year run in March. I had a funny feeling after Season 7 that they were getting ready for their final bow, but I didn’t want to admit it to myself. I’d almost pushed the thought out of my mind when I saw the announcement from stars James Roday and Dulé Hill, confirming my beliefs. I commend everyone involved for their decision, as much as it pains me to do. They didn’t let things drag out too long like a lot of series do. They felt it was time to move on.

The second episode of Fleming: The Man Who Would Be Bond had a much darker tone than the previous one, which does not come as too much of a surprise, since it takes place during World War II. Although, the war is not the only source of turmoil in Ian Fleming's life.

Psych is like a fresh pineapple on a hot, summer day. Cool, sweet, and refreshing. (I'm sure Shawn would say that a pineapple a day keeps the doctor away.) The show centers around Shawn Spencer (James Roday), a "psychic" consultant with the Santa Barbara Police Department and his best friend and reluctant partner Burton 'Gus' Guster (Dulé Hill) or Gee Buttersnaps, Squirts Macintosh, Ovaltine Jenkins, or whatever odd/hilarious name Shawn makes up for him. With Shawn's photographic memory, detective instincts, heightened observational skills, and charming personality, he's able to convince people that he's able to solve cases with psychic ability. "Oh, so it's The Mentalist?" C'mon, son! The Mentalist came out two years after Psych. Plus, Simon Baker wishes he had Shawn's exquisite hair.

If you’ve not heard of the BBC TV series Luther, do yourself a favor and Netflix the first two seasons and force your friends with satellite cable into having a Luther viewing party at their place for the third season, premiering September 3rd. If they don’t agree, they’re not really your friends, and you should look for new ones. Remember kids: friends don’t let friends miss Luther.

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