“It’s a tricky thing - weaving the old into the new.”
                Robert Ford to Bernard Lowe
                (perhaps speaking of the show itself?)

In our second excursion into the theme park, the plot has thickened, more mysteries are brought forward, and more themes have been revealed.  I wish to point out three recurring elements of this episode that point towards a fourth as a means of viewing Westworld: stories, secretsm and player pianos, all of which culminate in ruminations on the real.

Starring: Mike Colter, Mahershala Ali, Simone Missick, Theo Rossi, Erik LaRay Harvey, Rosario Dawson, Alfre Woodard.

“Who could have thought a black man in a hoodie could be a hero?”

The above quote doesn't come until the end of the series, but it's an apt one. With the release of Marvel's Luke Cage on Netflix, the story of the “bulletproof black man” is something that is not only relevant in terms of the series, but of the world as a whole. While Cage has been around since 1972 (when he was imagined by George Tuska, Archie Goodwin, and John Romita Jr.), his presence is just as important now as it's ever been, if not more so.

Like the canyons and mesas that form its beautiful, if artificial, backdrop, Westworld is full of echoes.  One can see and hear many, many other texts resonate through this one, including, but not limited to, Battlestar Galactica, Quentin Tarantino films (most notably Kill Bill and Django Unchained),  The Hunger Games, Terminator, and any number of “killer robot” films, including the original Westworld.  (Tangentially, was Michael Crichton beaten up at a Six Flags or something? Between this and Jurassic Park (also echoed), we get it - theme parks are evil. I’m still keeping my season pass to Universal Studios!)  References to other texts, to history, and to our world abound (not like in Stranger Things, in which virtually every reference is for nostalgic purposes, but rather to give us a world we think we know, but don’t really). Yet for all these echoes, what results on screen is a highly intelligent and original (if a little slow), unfolding narrative with great promise.   Part of the pleasure is playing spot-the-allusion (especially the music - the player piano rendition of “Black Hole Sun” is worth the watch alone!), but much of it comes from learning about this world and then seeing everything we think we knew (both from assumptions while watching and from presumptions based on earlier texts that do similar things) reversed or erased.

You know that friend who only has a few anecdotes and constantly keeps retelling the same stories over and over again? Steven Moffat has become that friend to Doctor Who, and no matter how great those stories were the first time, I am tired of them.

SPOILERS BELOW

It is no secret that I do not typically like episodes written by Mark Gatiss, so it came as a great surprise how much I enjoyed “Robot of Sherwood.”  It felt like a throwback to classic Doctor Who and was just an all-around fun episode.

SPOILERS BELOW

While “Into the Dalek” was by no means perfect, it was far better than the previous episode.  In this episode, we got to see a bit more of what the Twelfth Doctor will be like, and we also got the addition of a new cast member.

Do not hold your breath for “Deep Breath.”  Series 8 of Doctor Who has begun, and it is off to a mediocre start. Peter Capaldi deserved a better outing for his first full debut, and, more importantly, we, as the audience, did as well.

SPOILERS BELOW

It can be difficult to replicate an actor's voice in a comic book, but writer Nick Abadzis has been doing a great job capturing David Tennant's frenetic and wordy cadence in Titan Comics' Doctor Who: The Tenth Doctor.

This issue takes place between Series 5 and 6 of Doctor Who; however, it works as a great point for new Whovians to jump in.

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