So far in American Gods, there has been very little deviation from the book, but this week the show took quite a few liberties with “Git Gone.”  While this tends to anger purists, they managed to pull it off well and illustrate how adapting a story to another medium can expand it.

“Extremis” managed to accomplish the impossible: It made me like the Sonic Sunglasses.  For a bit of reference, the Twelfth Doctor abandoned his iconic Sonic Screwdriver and, for some inane reason, replaced it with sunglasses.  I am all for shaking things up on Doctor Who, but they served no purpose.  Instead of the Doctor aiming his Sonic Screwdriver at danger, he would just look at it—which is far less dynamic.

“Head Full of Snow” does not begin the same way as the previous two episodes of American Gods.  Instead of the prologue revolving around how a particular god came to America, it focuses on a present-day story of Egyptian gods Anubis and Bast ushering a woman into the afterlife.

“The Secret of Spoons” saw the introduction of several more deities into the world of American Gods while Shadow processes the death of his wife.  It may just be due to Ricky Whittle’s performance, but the show managed to portray Shadow’s grief as the motivation for his journey better than the book.  The final moments of the episode can be directly linked to his conflicting emotions and confusion brought on by the sudden death of a loved one.

“Knock Knock” was the least intriguing episode in Series 10 so far.  It is not that it is bad, I just found it a bit boring.  To be fair, if this is the lowest point in Series 10, then it will still be a solid season.

A word of warning—I will to try to minimize the spoilers in my reviews for American Gods; however, discussing and analyzing something as complex as American Gods is impossible to do without spoiling some things.

As implied by the cliffhanger in last week’s episode of Doctor Who, “Thin Ice” takes place during the 1814 London frost fair where the Doctor and Bill are greeted by an elephant walking on the frozen Thames.

I have a strong suspicion that Series 10 is going to be defined by the fantastic chemistry between Peter Capaldi and Pearl Mackie.  As the Doctor and his new companion, Bill, set off on their second adventure together, we are constantly reminded that she is exactly what Doctor Who needs right now.

I have never been a big fan of Steven Moffat’s run on Doctor Who; however, even I can admit that Series 10 is off to a great start.  With “The Pilot,” we have started the final season for both Moffat and star Peter Capaldi, leading to them handing off the baton to writer Chris Chibnall and the as-yet-unnamed Thirteenth Doctor this Christmas.

It’s a web series for the ages. Well, at least the period of the Renaissance. Okay, to be more precise, Knights of New Jersey is a web comedy series following actors through their funny exchanges with each other, cosplayers, and visitors at the Renaissance Faire. Sometimes, these moments end in a bruised ego, in more ways than one, and the overall result presents great onscreen chemistry and an entertaining comedy that seems like a seasoned ongoing series.

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