David Sedaris fans have waited a long time for this moment. Finally, one of his essays has been turned into a feature film. The chosen piece was taken from Sedaris’ 1997 collection of essays, Naked, and was the inspiration for the screenplay (adapted by Kyle Patrick Alvarez). C.O.G. follows Samuel (Jonathan Groff, Glee, Boss), an Ivy league student who’s having an identity crisis, as he leaves his life behind to work on an apple picking farm.

Ain’t Them Bodies Saints premiered in January at Sundance 2013. The following Theatrical Premiere took place on Tuesday (August 13th) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. The film stars Casey Affleck as Bob Muldoon and Rooney Mara (The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, The Social Network) as Ruth Guthrie. These childhood sweethearts and partners-in-crime are on the lam, and just as the film begins, Ruth reveals that she is pregnant. Ain’t Them Bodies Saints does not follow a couple’s joyride; it begins as their crime spree comes to a screeching halt.

The important question of this film isn’t so much “Who is Delsin?” but rather “What is Delsin?” As in, what is the film itself? Both the plot synopsis and the trailer hail it as a documentary. The synopsis begins by describing a horrific shooting in Tampa, Florida, as if it’s a real event, and one that we may possibly have heard about on the news. They interview a number of real people throughout. Brothers Pete and Paul Guzzo, the director and screenwriter, respectively, go out of their way to make it seem like the things in this film actually happened.

The FFOW! series takes a look at that vast library created by the proud and the passionate: fan films. Whether the budget and talent is astronomical or amateur, FFOW! celebrates the filmmakers whose love of comics, books, movies, video games, and TV shows inspires them to join the great conversation with their own homemade masterpieces.


Batman will appear in Superman’s next big-screen adventure, you say? Does that mean everyone in Gotham gets a brand new origin story? If you can’t wait until 2015, whet your appetite with a new, full-length origin starring the Caped Crusader’s most infamous villain.

I'm gonna be honest with you folks. I was not all that excited about The Wolverine the past few months leading up to its debut. Not like I was with Iron Man 3 or Man of Steel. No, the bloated mess that was X-Men Origins: Wolverine left such a bad taste in my mouth that I felt there was very little they could do to get back in my good graces.

Well, I am happy to report that The Wolverine exceeded my expectations. Yes, there are some gripes, of course, but they are minor. Also, this is a spoiler-free review, so enjoy!

Fiend by Peter Stenson is, in over-simplified TV terms, Breaking Bad meets The Walking Dead. In St. Paul, Minnesota, two meth heads emerge from seclusion after at least a straight week of binging, and find that the Zombie Apocalypse has happened while they were busy getting high. Chase and his best friend Typewriter embark on a journey to score more drugs, save Chase’s ex-girlfriend, and, simply, survive.

Many of the jokes and scenes in Feeding Mr. Baldwin are in pretty bad taste. Those also happen to be the jokes that are the funniest. The entire movie is one big comedy of errors—where the errors involve disposing of dead bodies.

 

Charlie ChristmasArrested Development. It's not just the name of a TV show involving people saying, "I've made a huge mistake," or a '90s hip-hop band that sang about a man named Mr. Wendel who was apparently from Tennessee. It's actually the name of a condition where someone becomes psychologically and/or emotionally stunted. I'm not sure which came first, but I know that the latter applies to the main character in the film The Unusual (Calling of) Charlie Christmas.

 

RushlightsTake one part True Romance, one part No Country for Old Men, and one part U Turn, and you’ll have the basic plot of Rushlights. As crime thrillers go, the plot is fairly standard. But, more important in this type of movie is the execution. And, all-in-all, Rushlights manages to hold its own.

 

LovelaceLovelace is an autobiographical film based on the life of Linda Susan Boreman (January 10, 1949-April 22, 2002), known to the public as Linda Lovelace.  Linda Lovelace is most well-known for starring in one of the most successful porno films ever made: Deep Throat. In 1972, Deep Throat had a huge cultural impact, bringing porno films into the mainstream.

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