When I first heard about this movie, I thought I had a pretty good idea of what it would be like: a young, talented chef saves himself, his family, and possibly the world, through the Power of Food™. That’s not what this film is. Instead, it’s something a good deal deeper, and a good deal more real.

It’s not often these days that I’ll see a movie in the theatre more than once. Who has time? It has to be something really special - truly unique - to draw me back in for a repeat, big-screen presentation. I just finished my second viewing of Richard Stanley’s Color Our of Space, based on the H.P. Lovecraft short story. I fell immediately in love with the film, which I had incredibly high expectations for upon my first viewing. The second viewing not only confirmed that love, but nourished it.

The main premise of Anderson Cowan’s debut feature film, Groupers, sounds simple: Psychology grad student Meg kidnaps two barhopping young men (Brad and Dylan) to use as subjects for her thesis experiment on whether homosexuality is a choice.  As the plot unfolds, it becomes clear that there is much more at stake than a simple test, and as Meg’s careful plan spirals out of control, the only constant is that homophobia is so totally ridiculous.

This will be a December long remembered by Star Wars fans, because the end of the Skywalker saga is upon us. With the upcoming release of Star Wars: Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker, director J.J. Abrams (Star Wars: The Force Awakens) not only brings Disney’s new Star Wars trilogy to an epic, exciting, and satisfying close, but manages to thematically weave all nine “Episodes” of the Star Wars franchise into a beautiful and meaningful journey about family, destiny, legacy, and the true meaning of power.

This movie is completely ridiculous—and I loved every minute of it. I didn’t expect to enjoy it as much as I did. Not that I was expecting to dislike it, but I figured it would be the type of movie I’d watch and then largely forget about. I can’t stop thinking about it, though. It’s tons of fun, and the kind of movie I can see myself watching regularly.

I’ve been a fan of the DC Universe animated movies since they began in 2007. They’ve created some fantastic films and told some amazing stories. That being the case, Batman: Hush has a lot to live up to. Does it succeed? Well, it doesn’t quite have the depth, or the quality, of some of the best DC Universe films, but it’s certainly fun and enjoyable.

While the entire last decade can be described as a transformative (and, in many ways, the golden) age of "geek" media, 2019 holds a special place as the year that will see three of the greatest cinematic pop culture narratives ever to receive their final chapter. No fan can be blamed from harboring huge expectations going into the final episode of Game of Thrones or the end of Star Wars' Skywalker saga; however, the bar has now been set even more incredibly high for the finale of those hugely popular franchises due to the near-perfect final piece in the Marvel Cinematic Universe's 22-movie storyline that is Avengers: Endgame.

While there is little concrete news about the future of the Alien franchise in a post-Disney/Fox merger world, the series does currently live on in licensed comic books, video games, and, most notably, an upcoming set of six cinematic shorts being released weekly on IGN, starting this Friday, March 29th, 2019.

The loss of Stan Lee last year hit the nerd community hard, but Captain Marvel is our reminder that his light will live on in those he inspired.  The latest entry in Marvel's Cinematic Universe (MCU) reminds us that there is still a lot to explore.

Reign of the Supermen is my favorite Superman story.  The comic book crossover event was used to revitalize the character (both literally and figuratively).  Decades later, some of those once-new elements have aged better than others.  The really fun part of the animated adaptation is that it again updates things to make it contemporary. At the same time, it knows when to embrace the '90s cheese.

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