Comics

Comics (1327)

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to review Our Super Adventure: Press Start to Begin. While doing so, my love of the artwork of Sarah Graley was rekindled. So, imagine my excitement when Minecraft: Volume 1 appeared on my radar with Graley's unmistakable style gracing the cover.

This is an extremely well-crafted collection of Bernie Wrightson's artwork that he created while working for DC Comics in the 1970s.  The creators of this collection put the attention and detail into the books that his artwork warranted.  The reproduction of his original artwork is of such fine quality that one can see beautiful, hand-crafted details from brush strokes to press type.

Something inside me needed Si Spurrier and Matías Bergara’s Coda. The tale of a world with the last bit of its magic dying. The tale of our anti-hero Bard named Hum and his insanely cool unicorn steed, Nag. What started as a journey to save his love Serka ended as a journey in which he was trying to save his soul from the worst version of himself for Serka.

Cullen Bunn is great. I enjoy his writing so much, and giving him a badass, anarchist character like Punk Mambo is a perfect match. Punk Mambo is a Voodoo Priestess from the London Punk scene, one of the best combos of words for a character since “blind swordsman gambling masseuse.” And, as you can imagine, Punk Mambo doesn’t give a flying fig about the rules, regulations, nor respect that many feel should be given to such powerful magic and spirits.

If you want to know a man, listen to his enemies.

Spencer & Locke 2 #2 explodes out of the gate with its latest release on Wednesday, May 29. The entire Spencer & Locke series is a dark and gritty look at the human psyche, where the main character deals with traumatic childhood abuses with the help of a special sidekick. Detective Locke depends on Spencer, an imaginary, big, blue panther, whether it be to ask for advice, help him in a gun fight, or defend his daughter in deadly situations. The bond formed with an imaginary character has never been greater – and the mental clock keeps on ticking.

A faceless enemy has emerged in Oblivion, ambushing and kidnapping people from both sides of the breach. No one knows what they are or what they want, but the Cole brothers intend to stop them. Robert Kirkman and Lorenzo De Felici's gripping new storyline intensifies in Oblivion Song #15.

Michael Dante DiMartino is taking Korra where no Nickelodeon cartoon has gone before, dealing with real social paradigms, in some cases breaking them and in other cases playing to new ones. For those that stopped following Korra: She’s gay. It was a wonderful and beautiful decision from DiMartino and Bryan Konietzko, and the story is being explored in a positively healthy way. Now, after dealing with an Earth Kingdom Empire run amok, team Korra has to deal with the creation of a democracy, and with that we see a different kind of villain - a political one that isn’t using all-out war to win. The parallels to what ours and many other countries face in the real world with hacked elections and outside interference is difficult to ignore. It goes to show just how flexible the world of Avatar is.

A little while back, I reviewed Ghost Tree #1. It served as a strong introduction to the story, with strong color design and a slick Japanese influence. If I had one complaint, it would have been that the actual narrative was a little sparse, laying a lot of groundwork but not a ton of payoff. That isn't uncommon for first issues of a new series, so I waited patiently to see if the second issue could follow through on the promise of the first.

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