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Comics (1637)

Briggs Land is a raging thunderstorm, and the characters contained inside, particularly main character Grace Briggs, are lightning bolts – and you never know when a powerful strike will take place.

For the last year or two, Dark Horse has been publishing a comic called The Rook which is, in my opinion, everything a good time travel story should be; however, as it turns out, like several of my favorite Dark Horse titles, this one is actually a reboot of a classic comic from back in the day. Furthermore, as they often do, they’ve now begun reprinting the original comics to coincide with the reboot.

In the last near-decade, Jamie McKelvie and Kieron Gillen made their mark on the world of comics in a big way with their hit series, Phonogram. After reading over 500 pages of the completed collection of the series, I realized two things: It's one of the most British things I've ever read, and it's also one of the most brilliant. Collecting the three major arcs (19 issues, along with some shorter pieces within the universe), The Complete Phonogram lives up to the hype the series has garnered as one of the most iconic series in recent history. With that being said, let's start the show.

The end of “Imperial Phase (Part One)” is here, and with it comes one hell of a party.  This is a pretty stark contrast to the way the rest of this arc has gone, with most of it being a bit more dour, what with this whole “Great Darkness” thing coming, and all of the Gods being a bit more divided on the whole subject, and each other.

Like most mothers, Linda Anderson isn’t perfect. She’s made more than a few bad calls in her life: She married a thief, started taking drugs when he passed away, and didn’t look after her son Hunter as well as she could have. But she’s been on the straight and narrow for a long time now, trying to make an honest living. Her son hasn’t.

Titan Comics released the first of two issues of Dark Souls: Tales of Ember earlier this month. Based on the video game developed by FromSoftware, Inc. and produced by Bandai Namco Entertainment, this issue collects three stories bookended by an intro and outro. The anthology expands on the lore of Lordan and Dragleic under the editorial guidance of Tom Williams (Dark Souls: Legends of the Flame) and Wilfried Tshikana-Ekutshu as the series designer. Lettering for the issue is provided by Williams and Michael Walsh (Hawkeye; King Warlock and Blue Bird).

Like a Hollywood bio-pic Milo Manara tackles the life of the genius artist Caravaggio, giving us explanations of what inspired his greatest works and who his female muses were, as well as his greatest adversaries. In the end, however, the story presented by Manara feels more like an explanation of events than an actual story.

Have you ever sat and listened to someone try and tell you their dream? Of course you have. No matter how interesting or crazy the dream is, there’s always a disconnect. You’re always just out of reach of the experience, because it’s not your dream. At its best, reading a comic book is like living in someone else’s dream, usually a handful of people. You’re sent on a journey, experience the adrenaline, and feel the feels. There is a tangible intersection, a crossroads of the conscious and subconscious.

Rock Candy Mountain, written and drawn by Eisner-nominated Kyle Starks, takes its silliness seriously and is serious in a very silly way, and wins because of it. This is a world with hobos, hobo mafias, and Satan. (Literally, the guy with horns makes an appearance.) Ya see, Satan is looking for someone and that someone is Jackson, and Jackson is looking for something and that’s Big Rock Candy Mountain. Yes, from the song.

In the introduction, the writer of the original Aliens comic book, Mark Verheiden, states that in the original publication, they weren’t able to call the characters Newt or Hicks due to interference with the chronology of the third film in the series. I’m ever so happy to report that this has finally been corrected, and everyone will finally be able to see what happened to Newt and Hicks if they weren’t killed like a Shakespearean character – off screen.

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