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Comics (1726)

“Hey, have you ever wondered what it would be like to kill someone?”

With the popularity of Rick and Morty, there are plenty of different ways to get your fix of the hit series. There's apparel, games, toys, and tons of other media in which to interact with the show. That includes comics, and along with the standalone Oni Press series, the publisher has now begun releasing spin-offs, this time focused on the Pokemon-style mobile game, Pocket Mortys. This collectible game lets you play as Rick as he travels through dimensions, capturing and battling different types of Mortys and becoming the world's greatest Morty Battler. This is also the experience we get in the new series, as it puts the attention on the original Morty, known as “Plain Morty,” as he fights for his life, attempting to escape from Rick and his quest to collect all the Mortys known to the universe.

Well, it looks like we're back. After a small break in the main series, our favorite series about decadent and self-destructive gods returns with what is being called “the second half of a double album,” with the opening of the newest arc, “Imperial Phase II.”  With the insanity that came with the last arc, things aren't pretty for the remaining gods left in the cast, especially since they're not only working against the mysterious and powerful being known only as “The Great Darkness,” but with the fallout from some major reveals that we knew as readers, but certain characters did not. And oh, things not go well when everything was out in the open.

Previously on Irredeemable Premier Edition Volume 3, “The greatest superhero, Plutonian, turns against his former team, the Paradigm, and the ensuing chaos seems irreversible. This is not just a tale of hero-turned-villain, it describes the vindictiveness associated with god-like powers.” Knowing that Plutonian might not be on their side one day, some members of the Paradigm made a pact with an alien race to solve their potential problem. The aliens returned, a battle ensued, Plutonian was captured using advanced technology, and the world was safe.

If you’ve read many of my reviews, you know that I love pretty much anything even remotely related to time travel. In particular, you may have seen my praise for The Rook, both in its modern incarnation and its cheesy 1970s original form. I have said in the past that The Rook is everything a time travel story should be, and a comic you won’t be able to put down. That said, this second collection of The Rook comics from Eerie Magazine in the late '70s is… decent.

The sign of a good story sometimes comes in the form of presenting a jumping-on point at a later time, allowing new readers to take part in the story’s world without fully understanding what’s previously taken place. For Postal Volume 5, it’s exactly what you can expect to find as you dive into the town of Eden, and those looking to maintain its prosperity or burn it to the ground.

The first issue of Clue brings to mind many memories of the mid-'80s film. Most of the original characters from the film are back, such as Mr. Boddy and Mrs. Peacock; however, there are new characters, too, such as Dr. Orchid and Sen. White. It's fun to see just how much this first issue resembles the opening of the film. You get the mandatory introduction of all the characters arriving at the mansion, as well as seeing them all interact with one another. The personality dynamics are quite engaging and fun to enjoy.



Saved New York City is on the brink of collapse, but can it be rescued from the White Wizard and his daughter, Chloe? That question is answered in the final issue of Snowfall, where science and fairy tale meet.

I really got into comics, in earnest, back in 2011. It was DC’s launch of the New 52 that gave me the “in” I’d been looking for. Sure, I’d read graphic novels and trade paperbacks for years, but I was always catching up, always years behind; I wanted to be current. I wanted to be able to experience tension of waiting with the rest of a readership to discover what shadowy force was behind Batman’s latest case. I sampled a lot of DC’s titles during this launch, especially some of the weirder ones that no one can remember having happened, and I learned a few things: One, I like some of the dark corners of the DC Universe I’d previously written off as relics of the 1970s and 1980s, and two, that I wanted to read more of Scott Snyder (who was writing Batman and Swamp Thing) and Jeff Lemire (writing Animal Man and Frankenstein: Agent of S.H.A.D.E.). Discovering the work of up-and-coming creators was a big part of why I’d wanted to get current on comics in the first place, and I always made it a point to follow what they were doing through that period at DC and into their own, creator-owned work elsewhere.

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