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Britannia: Lost Eagles of Rome is the third story arc which features the return of Rome’s first detective (referred to as “detector” in the story) Antonius Axia, an ex-military soldier who serves Emperor Nero.  The Valiant title has been described as “a combination of Batman meets Constantine set in the world of the Roman empire,” according to Bounding Into Comics’ John F. Trent (See “Valiant Comics Announces Britannia: Lost Eagles to Rome!” dated April 6, 2018.) but could also be termed a historical mystery.

What was fascinating about Bitter Root #1 was its ability to begin a story and weave together the stylistic feel of a Steampunk Harlem Renaissance with the issues of the present day. Bitter Root #2 continues that trend, picking up where we left off with Cullen and Berg battling a powerful, new Jinoo and protecting some civilians while a mysterious stranger mows down a KKK regiment who all turned to Jinoo themselves.

Comics, like any other media, suffer from an overdose of remakes, spinoffs, and sequels. If it isn't the juggernauts of Marvel and DC, then it's movie tie-ins, or TV tie-ins, and so on and so forth. That's why I sometimes go out of my way to pick up a comic purely because it doesn't appear to be related to any larger project. That's what motivated my decision to pick up Hex Vet: Witches in Training.

When I finished reading and reviewing Shards: Volume 1, I was eagerly ready for more content from the creators of In Hiatus Studios. Getting my hands on a digital copy of the second anthology was as exciting as my first read of Volume 1, and the wait was well worth it.

“We typically don’t know what we have until it’s lost” is a lesson that many of us heard growing up, and it’s one that Jack Boniface has to contend with in this issue of Shadowman. For years, he’s wanted to be rid of the Ioa, and in Issue #10, he is finally free from his curse, but everything always has a consequence of some sort.

I’m embarrassed to admit it, but I’ve never read Michael Moorcock’s books.  I’ve read almost every other fantasy writer, but, for some reason, I never got around to him. As I bow my head in shame, I can say that I finally know what has fascinated readers about the sword, Stormbringer, and the White Wolf (a.k.a. Elric of Melniboné).  Like all heroes (or anti-heroes), they carry a burden far greater than any of us could bear.

I read issue one of The Empty Man, but a concussion kept me from writing the review at the time, so here we are at issue two as Cullen Bunn taps into what makes online urban myths like The Tall Man spooky as hell to me. The Empty Man is a virus, or maybe a person, or maybe both that gets into the heads of its victims, making them do erratic and violent things. It can affect anyone at any time. It makes you see things, think things, believe things. It alters your reality. The idea is unnerving. The execution makes it more so.

Ho, ho, Hellboy, the magical man in red is coming to your comic store this holiday (this Wednesday to be specific), and he brings with him some most welcome friends. Considering that Christmas was originally a pagan holiday, a Hellboy Winter Special seems far more fitting than our usual festivities. I wonder if the Winter Solstice festivals around the world would ever consider incorporating this wonderful creation and bizarre world of talking animals and snotty spirits into their celebrations. If this new movie is a hit (Fingers crossed!), Hulu or Amazon should do a Hellboy Winter Special… but I digress…

When I started playing The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild in December of 2017, I was immediately entranced by the beautiful, open-world design of the game, the immersive storyline, and the intricate character design. For me, the game mechanics were (and remain) secondary to the more narrative elements of the text. I was thrilled to receive a review copy of The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild - Creating a Champion, because it allowed me to further indulge in the rich fantasy space of the Zelda universe.

I know this is issue #1 of Hellboy and the B.P.R.D 1956, but, really, it’s an ongoing series that’s well into its run. Be that as it may, this issue is sort of ground zero for a new story arc, and I thought I’d see how easy it would be for me to jump on board. While there are some story beats between characters that are lost on me, the general sense of the events are pretty understandable.

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