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Back again is one of the best and most insane books in Image Comics' current roster, Curse Words. In this world, magic exists, and the magic in this world is mostly done by one guy - Wizord - who is, you guessed it, a wizard of sorts. In previous issues, he's used his totally legit magical powers to do some pretty great things; Wizord turned people platinum, shrank a baseball stadium, and basically impressed the whole world with his wizarding abilities. But during that time, there's been a whole other thing going on with Wizord's home world. There's been some major upheaval in the Hole World, mostly as its leader attempts to destroy Wizord for betraying him in this whole “Destroy the world” bit he has.

March brings with it another excellent issue of Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 11 from the creative team of writer Christos Gage and artist Georges Jeanty. As Buffy and her friends remain at the mercy of the authoritarian policies being enacted by the United States government, our Slayer make a calculated move that aligns her with her captors and increases the enemies around her ten-fold, all with the hope that it will lead to an eventual path to escape.

Thinking later, shooty shooty now.

Ruby cut her toxic friends out of her life in Geek-Girl #3, but it’s hard when you have to attend school with them!  She’s analyzing whether she needs to keep her alter-identity secret when everything with Lightning Storm comes to a head, but the guys who created the power glasses simultaneously are pressuring Ruby to get them back.  Could the timing be any worse?

In Conan the Slayer, Conan has found himself leading a group of warrior Kozaks. So far, the story has dealt with family intrigues on par with something biblical: brother against brother, son against father, and dark demons. In Issue #7, Conan finds himself with his fellow Kozaks crossing the sea. A Conan story wouldn’t be Conan without a little violence – he is “the Slayer” after all – as they come across a ship full of pirates.

Matt Kindt is a writer’s writer. I really don’t know what that means, except that I’m a writer and to speak in a voice as unique as his own is what every writer aspires to do. To have every comic he puts into the world be a fully formed and authentic vision is a staggering achievement.

I can see a potential path beginning to form: the possibility of where this may be going. Black Hammer is a psychological superhero mystery. I imagine it would be what the superhero genre would look like if Philip K. Dick had any interest in it. A team of heroes has been stuck on a farm for 10 years. Up until now, the events surrounding this have been a mystery. Instead, we’ve been drawn into this secluded and compartmentalized world in which these characters are ghosts of their former selves simply trying to maintain. It has been ponderous, exciting, heartbreaking, disturbing; it has been a joy to read.

When I received word Magdalena was making a print comeback, I was super excited. Being one of the first comics I had ever picked up, it was nice to see another former pull list staple from the Top Cow Universe was soon to make reappearance on comic book shelves.

The opening pages to Scott Larson’s Visitations: The Great Balloon Disaster make it abundantly clear that the mixture of history and supernatural fun in the first issue were no accident.  He skillfully blends historic figures and events like suffragette Elizabeth Booth and the annual Fourth of July balloon races into a tale that provides insight into Clayton Blackwood’s lovely young companion, Miss Nellie McCullough (and her very special equine friend, Kincaid).

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