‘She Could Fly #3:’ Advance Comic Book Review

Christopher Cantwell, creator and writer of She Could Fly, doesn’t cheat. There are several times in this third issue in which he could have. He could have taken an easy route to connect storylines, manipulated things as he deemed fit, but he doesn’t. He lets the characters take the wheel and, in doing so, every twist and turn naturally heightens and puts the characters in greater danger. This is phenomenal writing.

She Could Fly is about a mysterious girl who could fly who then mysteriously died, as well as a tenth-grade girl named Luna who needs to find out who she was. That need is so strong that we’re not only pulled into the story, we’re also pulled int Luna’s chaotic mind. This book is taking a strong look at mental illness and the desire that someone would do anything they could to be free of it.

In the mix are a bunch of other nefarious characters: some wanting to help Luna and some wanting the secrets to how she could fly. Two major characters are Bill and Verna. Bill is a physicist who was hired to build a flying device. He went on the run and is being hunted down. Verna is a hooker that’s been with Bill who may or may not love him. Bill is paranoid as hell, for very good reason. That paranoia is eating away at him. My favorite moment in this issue occurs between Verna and Luna, when Luna finally opens up to someone. This story isn’t simply driven by characters and what they want, it’s driven by pure emotion. It’s driven by characters reacting to external forces beyond their control. It’s driven by these characters doing everything they can to simply function and not crack. It’s a whirlwind of a trip.

Martin Morazzo’s art is intoxicating. It's visceral and cinematic, but also intimate. Circling back to my favorite moment in this issue: In Luna, you see the face of a fractured teenager - someone hoping to connect, hoping that someone will understand - and her reaction to Verna is both heartbreaking and hilarious. To capture awkward vulnerability like that is a talent.

Since starting this book, I have been enraptured. All of the characters are complex. The story, while having great elements of a thriller, also has a certain elevated, ethereal quality, something spiritual and beyond the understanding of science. There’s so much going on in each issue that it’s like reading three issues. This is one of the best experiences you’re going to get out of a comic book right now. Hop on board.


Creative Team: Christopher Cantwell (writer), Martín Morazzo (artist), Clem Robbins (letters), Miroslav Mrva (colors), Karen Berger (editor), Rachel Roberts (associate editors), Mike Richardson (publisher), Adam Pruett (digital art technician)
Publisher: Dark Horse Comics
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