‘Ion Grip #1-2:’ Comic Book Review

Ion Grip is a futuristic tale that mixes government spy agencies and space adventures into one. The story is filled with classic ray guns, intergalactic action sequences, vibrant colors, and a main character who sometimes fails to win a fight.

Our “hero,” Ion Grip, is a banished agent who has seen his fair share of missions. His moral code might limit characters in this comic book from calling him a hero, but he stands by his actions – even when they get him exiled from a planet, or added to assassins’ hit lists, or hated by an entire civilization. No, he seems content with his actions, which have led him to working on space satellites and a regular at a bar where the bottle is left with him.

Writer A.P. Weber creates a new galaxy, and he introduces this world in “Who is Ion Grip?” Weber showcases alien creatures, different weapons, factions in altercations, and two of the main characters. One of these characters, Mya Mayburn, is Mr. Grip’s handler who has an Amanda Waller-type persona, which she aims to guide Grip’s actions. Grip leads the life of a mercenary, who lets his conscious guide him even when it might cause trouble in the long run, which will make the relationship with Mayburn even that more interesting moving forward.

Artist John Gajowski brings this story to life with a variety of aliens and villains that are somewhat easy to recognize. In the duplicitous nature of spying, always question the man with the big mustache, because in this case, he’s definitely not Tom Selleck portraying Magnum, P.I. Not even close. This deep undercover is devious and doesn’t seem capable of looking after anyone other than himself. Along with colorist Samantha Carrasco, the first two chapters of Ion Grip are illustrated with bold colors, which hold your attention on the pages to view them all; vibrant blues, purples, reds, and an assortment of other colors highlight energy blasts and all things in space, including equipment, a planetary ring, and some stellar rocket bike costumes for an “underground” race.

Overall, Ion Grip highlights the life of our self-titled character who is seen as a traitor by many; yet, he is still wanted by a top-level organization that wants nothing more than to take assignments from the highest bidder. It’s an interesting dichotomy presented as Grip will most likely find himself in a predicament that goes against his very nature, putting himself in a position similar to the one that left him exiled in the first place.

Will Ion Grip continue to let his conscious guide his path as he moves beyond the first two comic books in the series? Will Mayburn keep Grip in check and use his skills to benefit her own goals? And what about the guy in the mustache? Yeah, I’m pretty sure we hate that guy.

Ion Grip #1-2 are currently available in digital formats.

Go to top