‘Adamant #2:’ Comic Book Review

Adamant is about a superhero who’s suddenly flung into a strange and unfamiliar future. In the first issue, we saw our titular hero arrive in this new world, completely bewildered by his surroundings (which included a human-sized talking frog, along with a very interesting evolution of slang). In this issue, we get to see a little more of this world and get a slightly better idea of just what’s going on.

At the end of the last issue, Adamant was confronted by Dr. Alpha, his lifelong arch-nemesis and the man who sent him to the future in the first place; however, as Pogo the frog points out to us at the beginning of this issue, things aren’t always what they seem.

Could it be that Dr. Alpha is actually on the side of good now, helping to protect the people of this future world against an enemy far greater than he ever was? Maybe, maybe not, but either way, Adamant has a hard time buying it. And, one can hardly blame him, either—particularly as we flash back to a scene from their long and bitter history together.

One of the things that made the first issue stand out was that scenes in the past were drawn by one artist, and scenes in the future were drawn by another. This issue continues that motif, intercutting scenes in the future-present with flashbacks to Adamant’s home era.

However, what makes it kind of odd is that the future scenes in this issue are drawn by the artist who drew the scenes in the past last issue (Ian Waryanto), while the flashbacks to the past in this issue are done by another artist entirely (Dann Franco). This makes the difference in visual style between issues a bit jarring. Still, it’s interesting to see different interpretations of the same characters and the same world, and all the artists thus far have been very talented.

The writing by Mike Exner III is great, too. This is a cool and unique story, with strange and compelling characters and a plotline that keeps you on your toes at all times—and IN all times. At this point, just about anything can happen, as it’s clear that, as previously stated, nothing is what it seems. The farther we go, the more layers will no doubt be pulled back from this world, both past and future. I can’t wait to see what happens next—or what happened previously.

Go to top