Oh boy, where to begin with X-Men Destiny? When I first heard of the game about a year ago, it just didn't seem like something that grabbed my attention. Sure, it's a cool idea to play as an original character, choose your own powers, and fight alongside the X-Men, but something just didn't sit right. You know that feeling when you're reading previews for games and you just KNOW it's going to be terrible? This is that game. And, the fact that I played it coming right off of amazing games like Uncharted 3 and Arkham City made this experience just that much more painful.


At the start of the game we find ourselves at a rally following the death of Charles Xavier. Here we meet our 3 main characters to choose from. But, choose wisely, my friends! For the choice you make probably doesn't make any difference whatsoever, besides each character's own personal "story line." I chose the little Japanese girl, Aimi Yoshida, voiced by Jamie Chung, since I like faster characters, but, again, I don't think it really would have mattered. The mutant power I chose was Shadow Matter, which is a quick teleporting-type ability that's fast and manipulates matter into shadow-like blades. Hence the name. The other 2 powers that I didn't choose were Energy Projection, which I think is pretty self-explanatory, and Density Control. Density Control sounds interesting when you first read the description...

 

Most contemporary game franchises have taken an “every other year” approach to releases. Call of Duty is the biggest first-person shooter today that demonstrates how successful this habit can be. Every other year we’re treated to a Modern Warfare title, interspersed by Treyarch’s even-numbered year offerings. So, when Battlefield 3 comes along five years after its sci-fi predecessor Battlefield 2142, there’s a natural expectation that something special is in store for gamers. The Bad Company spinoffs have ensured that the franchise hasn’t been entirely devoid of new blood in the meantime, but they’ve explored different play styles as opposed to the main series and aren’t comparable. Surely, the logic goes, Battlefield 3 has great things in store for its loyal fanbase.

I was still enthusiastic even after Electronic Arts became more involved than they have been in the past. EA has a notorious reputation amongst gamers that’s mostly deserved as a result of interfering with game development out of short-sighted marketing plots. The major claim to fame for the Battlefield franchise has always been its deep multiplayer and primary focus on its PC-based users. EA has decided to cash in on that fact.

Greetings, Fanboys and Fangirls!

We at Fanboy Comics are doers, so we really dig new projects. We’re also comic book fans, so art is really important to us. And, our dedication to the zombies of the world really can’t be overstated. Understandably, we were more than a little excited when we got wind of Z.A.P., the Zombie Art Project.

Toy sculpture/artist Mikie Graham is the individual responsible for the undead toy horde that is the Zombie Art Project. Graham’s zombies are shambling off at the pace of eight customized and zombified Playmobil figures a week, all leading up to a culmination on Halloween 2011, when he will release a completely custom play set.

I’ll come right out with it: if you care about good writing in games and you’re one of the few that seems to know that the Warhammer 40K universe did space marines and chainsaw weapons first, Space Marine deserves serious consideration. The rich Warhammer 40,000 (that’d be 40,000 A.D.) dystopia—a mix of Starship Troopers, the Cthulhu mythos, and George Orwell’s 1984, complete with a Big Brother equivalent—and its titular marines brought to bear in the story of a strategic industrial planet that’s under siege by marauding space Orks. You read that correctly. There’s also a space Sauron, but that comes later and really, really shouldn’t be a spoiler if you’ve read any of the advertising (or know anything about the 40K setting).

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