The Forever War #2 continues the comic book adaptation of the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning book by Joe Haldeman. During the course of the first chapter, Haldeman explores the depths of space, along with the training associated with fighting an alien species that has already attacked colonists. The depth of physical and emotional endurance has been tested and death has come at the expense of learning under extreme conditions.

John Arcudi has been around since the '90s, writing everything from Aquaman to Hellboy to Aliens. I’ve seen his name on comics that I’ve read, but I don’t think (of what I’ve read) anything has quite hit me like Dead Inside. This feeling took me by surprise. Dead Inside is a murder mystery set within the confines of a prison system. The first issue set things in motion; it didn’t quite grab me, but it was interesting enough to continue on. After four issues, I’m hooked.

From issue to issue, Matt Kindt’s books are a thrill to read, and Ether is no exception. We’ve been following the story of a scientist, Boone, who travels into another dimension, a fantastical one called the Ether, to solve crimes and disprove the magic of the world. As it turns out, this fantastical world is pretty dark at its core, and Boone, like an addict it seems, has slowly lost his life to it. In the Ether, he is a hero. He is Sherlock Holmes and Indiana Jones rolled up into one. In the real world, he lives on the street and has pushed everyone he cares about away from him. Even the way to get into the Ether could only ever be discovered by someone willing to basically kill themselves.

In the first issue of American Gods, P. Craig Russell and Scott Hampton effectively bring to life the darkness and mystery of Neil Gaiman’s brilliant novel. The variant covers, drawn by several different artists, illuminate terrors of mythology and provide a glimpse of the intensity this thrilling story promises to provide. The covers are enticing and spellbinding and serve as perfect entry points to a visualized adaptation of Gaiman’s masterpiece.

If you’re uncertain about what comic book to buy next, especially because one issue might not give you all that you’re looking for as it builds upon an origin story or what to expect from particular characters, then bypass any number ones and pick up Giant Days: Volume Four. This BOOM! Box trade paperback collects issues 13 through 16, as writer John Allison dives further into the wonderfully entertaining lives of college freshman roommates Daisy, Esther, and Susan. Not only does a fourth volume suggest the success of Giant Days as a proven commodity, the stories told within these pages by Allison are brilliantly funny by providing the reader with three characters who are constantly building upon their friendship, watching them grow before you as they navigate their daily lives. Or perhaps you’ll just enjoy the regular banter they have with each other, and toward the rest of the world, as they search for a new place to live, attempt to find a job, enter a film festival, and look for romance in all of the places. (Whether any of them are right or wrong, you’ll get to see first-hand.) If you need any more proof, it’s literally printed right on the cover – “Will Eisner Nominee for ‘2016 Best Writer’ and ‘2016 Best Continuing Series.’”

When we last left our crew of stalwart and increasingly more impatient Gods, they were doing what all large groups of Gods with limited time left and a rising threat on the horizon do: sit around and vote on what to do. With the Great Darkness in retreat for now, the group - in all of their wisdom - chose from three options: fight the thing, study it, or kind of just do whatever and who cares. The latter won out, because of course it did, and this issue gets the anarchy going in a big way. The factions of Gods have splintered once again, with several looking to study, some preparing for battle, and others doing anything (or anyone) that strikes them.

In this penultimate issue of Snowfall from Joe Harris and Martín Morazzo, the line between terrorist and patriot becomes very thin.

The air is frigid. Snow falls to the ground, covering every inch moving forward. The fallen medieval soldier is within sight of sanctuary, a large house toward the mountain top. Though, his outstretched arm does not reach for warm comfort; instead, he reaches for some kind of snow queen cascaded in blue and white light. Will she rescue the warrior? Will her ability to control winter protect him from the brutal elements waiting within?

Last stop.

There are certain rides we all know that we shouldn't take - strangers with big vans, the cab without lights, some lady with a Jesus fish and beads on the seats - but some rides will really be your last.  The Greeks had Charon to ferry souls across the Styx to the afterlife, Disney made a pretty penny off of giving Davey Jones and the Flying Dutchman a similar task, and now Simon Birks, RH Stewart, Lyndon White, and Dan Thorens at Blue Fox Comics present the last thing that some jerks will ever need: hope.

Welcome to the Grass Kingdom, a microcosm of civilization. In Matt Kindt’s newest series, Grass Kings, a collective of people have laid claim to a small territory of land. Here, they abide by their own laws and rules. The first issue has the local officer escorting a trespasser off the private land. The trespasser is a young man who calls the people who live there squatters. From there, the first issue is mostly expository as we’re given a tour of the Kingdom; it’s not a terribly involving first issue story-wise. Despite its lackadaisical beginning, Kindt has earned my trust in building a story, which only comes into focus at the end of this issue. Echoes of the past point to conflicts in the future, conflicts that appear to rise from a mystery that has been left unsolved: a crime.

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