Navy veteran and award-winning Golden Age comic book artist Sam Glanzman brought the battles of World War II into the hands of readers. His powerful renderings depict a realistic glimpse into the challenges and energy of combat. Publisher and Editor-In-Chief Drew Ford has put together a collection of Glanzman’s work from the series, Combat. Coming off Christopher Nolan’s 2017 film, Dunkirk, audience members now have another opportunity to see the battle and rescue brought back to life. Releasing Glanzman’s work now is also a nice tribute, as he recently passed away in July 2017 at the age of 92.

In Issue #6 of Monster Matador, Ramon learned of a chupacabra threatening the town of his new-found compatriots.  In Issue #7, armed with his sword, bullfighter’s uniform, and fierce faith, he works to eliminate the menace only to have his daughter and her friends get threatened by the terrifying beast.  Will our Matador arrive in time? Can a French cook with a litany of insults and a meat cleaver be a hero? Then, Issue #8 faces the harsh reality of Ramon and Adelita’s nomadic lifestyle: When a new threat arises, the Matador must face it, so they cannot bond too closely to one place; however, travel in a post-apocalyptic world gets dicey, so our father-daughter team must head into a seedy outpost to plead with an aging, antagonistic pilot for transport to the next threat.

Shanghai Red has always been a revenge story from the start. Red, after having killed her captors, takes the ship she was forced to work on, and in meeting up with her sister, hunts down the people that took away an entire year from her. Her alternate persona, Jack, protects her and does the killing of all of the men responsible.

As we gear up for the last arc of The Wicked + The Divine, we get one more of these interesting and illuminating one-shots featuring the gods we've come to know and love during one of their previous runs in the world. This time, we go to 1373 during the time of the Black Plague. While we don't see too many of the gods we've met before, but we do get a look at a long-gone member of the Pantheon, our beloved Lucifer.

Holy Beyoncé, this book uses the boot of social justice to kick the pants clean off of the patriarchy, and it looks great doing it.

You don’t often see the characters' eyes in Cold Spots by Cullen Bunn and Mark Torres, but when you do, there’s something that needs to be seen: the thing that they’re looking at and also a glimpse of their humanity. Otherwise, these characters are stepping out of a hard-boiled noir and right smack dab into the middle of a gothic ghost story.

Just when things could not get more exciting in the world of The Ash, the Winters family and those battling for control of their drug empire have a few surprises in store.

I’ve been a Jack Campbell (a pseudonym for John Hemry) fan for quite a while.  I discovered his Lost Fleet military space-faring novels while perusing Amazon, and I read through them as fast as I could get them. My husband got hooked, as well, as Campbell is one of the few military sci-fi writers who depict space battles accurately - meaning that space is a big place, and it takes a long time for messages and images to arrive, as well as using the three dimensions of space in battle strategy.  What I like best about him is that he is living proof that a solid professional writer can get better – a lot better. You can see the improvement in The Lost Stars and The Genesis Fleet series.

The '80s were awesome: Dungeons & Dragons, government conspiracies, secret labs held by evil corporations, parallel universes, strange paranormal powers, monsters escaping into our world, Midwestern small town mysteries involving children, and rad synthesized music scores.

Let’s talk Bock-Darr, baby!

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