This month brings the final issue of Dark Horse Comics’ Serenity: No Power in the ‘Verse, written by Chris Roberson and featuring the art of Georges Jeanty, in what will surely be a bittersweet ending for fans who’ve been following along.

In the alternate fictional reality of Anno Dracula 1895: Seven Days in Mayhem #1, Prince Dracula was not defeated by Van Helsing and company. Instead, he became the ruler of Great Britain, which encouraged vampires to emerge from the darkness, making for a Victorian London rampant with vampires. Dracula has ruled for 10 years now, and a resistance group is making plans to overthrow him, while others are planning his jubilee. The premise for this tale is brilliant in the way that Prince Dracula essentially becomes a political figure with those who publically celebrate him in contrast to those who want to usurp him. Adding the animal creatures that Dracula also commands demonstrates his complete power over man, animal, and undead. Kim Newman’s plot is a wonderful spin on the Victorian Gothic vampire problem.

I’ve always been fascinated by the henchpeople employed by supervillains in superhero stories. They’re usually just background, incidental to the action: an obstacle for the hero to overcome before moving on to bigger game. But what drives someone to go into that line of work? What are their lives like outside of their jobs? Does it pay well? Henchgirl attempts to answer some of these questions and weaves a thoroughly entertaining story in the process.

I reviewed the first issue of this comic in July of last year. Then, due to various circumstances, I never had a chance to continue the story. I very much wanted to, though, which is why I was excited for the chance to review this first volume, collecting the first six issues of the comic together. Though it wasn’t perfect, I saw a lot of potential in the first issue, and I’m happy to report that subsequent issues have lived up to that potential admirably.

Orphan Black: Deviations #1 shows us what would happen if Sarah had saved Beth from committing suicide on the train platform. Despite this major twist in plot, this issue still really feels like the TV show. Heli Kennedy keeps much of the familiar plot in tact. The key players are introduced, and they reference several complications likely to fully develop in upcoming issues. This issue is jam-packed with exciting moments. It brings me back to the early episodes of season 1 of the show. My main question is: How will Beth alter things to come? I can’t imagine that the story proceeds exactly as it did on the show with Beth added into the mix. She is an original member of Clone Club who has lots of resources. She should definitely impact some of the drama yet to unfold. And I also look forward to how Kennedy will imagine the dynamic between Beth and Helena.

Dan Abnett has been writing since the '90s. He’s a good writer. His work on the video game, Alien: Isolation, is really quite good, but for some reason his Life and Death series has felt less than inspired. Even on a basic structural level, it’s been pretty clumsy. The dramatic thrust sort of moves haltingly forward. There’s nothing surprising that occurs and every interesting idea is undercut by characters that aren’t all that interesting.

Dark Horse gives its fans - and anyone interested in taking a glimpse into successful runs in the comic book world - a collection of first issues that will capture your attention. In today’s comic book world, there are an endless number of titles listed online in locations like ComiXology, or in your local comic book shop. When you stop by to take a look, the experience might be overwhelming if you’re uncertain of what you’re looking for. Now, in enters Dark Horse Number Ones 2017 – a collection of eight comic books from different series.

Back again is one of the best and most insane books in Image Comics' current roster, Curse Words. In this world, magic exists, and the magic in this world is mostly done by one guy - Wizord - who is, you guessed it, a wizard of sorts. In previous issues, he's used his totally legit magical powers to do some pretty great things; Wizord turned people platinum, shrank a baseball stadium, and basically impressed the whole world with his wizarding abilities. But during that time, there's been a whole other thing going on with Wizord's home world. There's been some major upheaval in the Hole World, mostly as its leader attempts to destroy Wizord for betraying him in this whole “Destroy the world” bit he has.

March brings with it another excellent issue of Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Season 11 from the creative team of writer Christos Gage and artist Georges Jeanty. As Buffy and her friends remain at the mercy of the authoritarian policies being enacted by the United States government, our Slayer make a calculated move that aligns her with her captors and increases the enemies around her ten-fold, all with the hope that it will lead to an eventual path to escape.

Thinking later, shooty shooty now.

Page 8 of 47
Go to top