It wasn’t that I had my doubts about Black Badge. After finishing The Grass Kings, I’d put my trust in the creative team of Matt Kindt, Tyler Jenkins, and Hillary Jenkins any time. Like The Grass Kings, Black Badge took a few issues to settle into itself. The entirety of issue seven had me exclaiming out loud at the end, “Oh, sh*t!”

I’ve been waiting expectantly for a month. Since turning that final page of issue eight, I’ve been asking myself, “Is this the week?” “Did I miss it last week?” “Did it come out on time?” Finally, it’s here, and I could read issue nine over and over again and still love it, still find something to pull from it. It’s full of regret, pain, disgrace, and treats someone who is finally dealing with being honest with themselves in a pretty direct way, which can be the most difficult thing to deal with: realizing that it’s your fault.

I was about seven years old when my brother first showed me Starcraft. This juggernaut of a game was instrumental in forming my tastes on the science fiction genre as a whole. The series is now best known for its competitive scene, but I was fascinated with the exciting and mysterious lore the game hinted at in its campaign. I, admittedly, dropped off with the series around the time of Heart of the Swarm, but Starcraft Volume 1: Scavengers, with its retro logo and cover art, reminded me of those early days playing the game on some long-forgotten PC.

Errand Boys, the five-issue miniseries from Image Comics, concludes with the last issue that will drop this Wednesday.  Written by D.J. Kirkbride (Amelia Cole, The Once and Future Queen), this sci-fi space adventure follows half-brothers Jace and Tawnk as they try to stay one step ahead of the law and firmly rooted amongst the living.  They are also getting to know each other as they seek common ground in which to establish a familial relationship.  

Ruby Kaye is back in the game after Summer took a beating from Nina at the end of Geek-Girl Series #2 Volume 3! Neon Girl wants Maine’s resident geek superheroine to team up and take down the Legion of Larcenists, plus Ruby realizes once again who her true friends are. In the final pages, Geek-Girl gets the chance of a lifetime for a fledging Cape, but will she take it? Is it really what Ruby Kaye wants for her life, or is it just a little too much?

……The year is 2037 and the world as we know it has changed dramatically.  With all the colossal technical advancements of the age, the most significant came from Drexler Nanotech Corporation, who created a serum engineered to resurrect the dead.  The ethical implications were widespread and the serum was ultimately banned the world over….

I’ve never seen a red so red. I’ve never seen a white page so white. I sat staring, afraid to turn the page, but knowing that I would have to, and after I did, I spent two minutes gasping for breath as I cried. Yes, sometimes, comics make me cry. I have a feeling, though, that there’s more in store as Lemire ends the second volume and makes his way bravely into the third volume of Gideon Falls.

Rat Queens #14 picks up right where the previous issue left off. Dee is now seemingly a cleric imbued with the power of the halfling deity, Betty is both confused and excited that her friend is there to save them, and everyone else is kind of trapped in a cage. This issue sets us up for the next one, with one important thing to note: Braga has a more intimate reason for seeing this adventure through.

Fair warning that this month's installment of Criminal does not continue the Teeg Lawless story from January's critically acclaimed first issue. But don't be deterred, because powerhouse creators Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips deliver a new story in Criminal #2 that does not disappoint.

Issue #4 marks the end of Dark Horse’s God of War series set before the events of 2018’s God of War video game relaunch. This series has basically served as a vehicle for the second most important relationship explored in the video game: the emotional turmoil between Kratos’ bloody and violent past with his quieter present state as a father and husband, bridging the two Kratoses. The medium actually lends itself well to the more introspective tone that’s interspersed between some trademark Kratos smackdowns.

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