Greg Pak and Giannis Milonogiannis have something on their mind, which makes their collaboration on Ronin Island that much more successful. Set after the fall of the Shogun, Japan and its surrounding countries have fallen into a sort of post-apocalyptic scenario that we’re just starting to get a handle on.

You ever have one of those days in which just about every little thing can go wrong? It would be hilarious if you weren’t so annoyed. Gil Starx finds himself in that position in issue two of Sea of Stars. This is a space odyssey about a father (Gil Starx) who is a widowed intergalactic trucker and his son Kadyn who has been dragged along on a job. When their rig is split in two by a space leviathan, both are tossed into the cold of space with nothing but their space suits and wits.

“If the world will not have me in it, it cannot have me at all.” ~ Izzy Tyburn

I must admit I haven't ready nearly as much of Neil Gaiman's work as I probably should. I'm most familiar with Gaiman through the book, Coraline, but his reputation precedes him. I can barely go a week without colleagues recommending one of his books to me. Shirking suggestions to read American Gods or The Sandman, I decided to pick up an adaptation of one of Gaiman's lesser-known stories: Snow, Glass, Apples (specifically the graphic novel adaptation illustrated by Colleen Doran).

Berserker Unbound is a four-issue series from Dark House that brings the sword and sorcery genre straight to modern-day New York. In a similar vein to works such as the Arnold Schwarzenegger film, Hercules in New York, the Julian Sands film, Warlock, Beastmaster 2: Through the Portal of Time, and the upcoming Nick Mamatas book, Sabbath, the first issue of Berserker Unbound displaces the titular berserker from the fantasy past into a modern-day metropolis – New York.

There are so many stories to be told and so many that should not be forgotten. Shanghai Dream is one of those stories.

Chapter 2 of Matt Schorr and Joe Bilicic’s Moby Dick: Back from the Deep shows the chaos that ensues in a beach town when there is a threat to the water. If you go into the water, you risk attack from the beast, but many people are more concerned about how their businesses will be hurt by closing the beaches. As the saga continues, we see the tensions rising internally and externally, as the majestic monster becomes an increasing threat to the lives and livelihood of the townspeople.

Issue three is the final installment of the Carson of Venus: The Flames Beyond story arc. The previous two issues saw Carson Napier captured by the villainous Varlek Sar and meeting Loto, an Earth-born woman who is gifted with the same astral projection powers as Napier. Sar tricks Napier in becoming an experiment in his weird science device that is able to not only make real Napier’s astral projections, but duplicate them, as well.

One of the finds I made at San Diego Comic-Con this year was the trade paperback of Vindication by MD Marie.  A taut crime thriller set in Los Angeles, it explores the ever-growing distrust between law enforcement and the African-American community that it is sworn to protect.

Carson Napier’s Venusian adventures continue in issue two of Carson of Venus: The Flames Beyond. In this installment, Varlek Sar has taken Napier captive and brought him to his lab in the technocratic city-state of Havatoo. Sar has built a device that is able to not only make Napier’s astral projections manifest physically, but also to duplicate the projections, as well. He coerces Napier into his machine for dastardly results. Meanwhile,  Napier’s betrothed Duare attempts to rally the different races and nations of Venus to attack Havatoo to not only free Napier, but to save the planet from tyranny.

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