In general, I find that the adventures in The Rook are better when they feature more of stalwart protagonist Restin Dane and less of his grandfather, Bishop Dane. While this volume starts out with a very heavy dose of Bishop, mercifully, he becomes, for the most part, less important and less prominent as things progress.

Coyotes is a unique tale in how its narrative is designed and unfolds. Sean Lewis certainly has an idea for his Western tale that he spins. With the jarring opening, Lewis uses this to put the reader in the middle of the story. It causes us to ask questions about what exactly is happening and why the new officer on the force ended up in such a situation. And then, we are introduced to our main protagonist who seems to be the one responsible for exactly what was happening. The officer moves into the next situation and seeks to take the girl to be questioned.



Adamant, the world’s most indestructible superhero, has been displaced in time and now finds himself in a dark, dystopian future he can barely understand, full of deadly machines and talking frogs. When we last left our hero, he was having trouble wrapping his mind around the fact that his former arch-nemesis, Dr. Alpha, is now the leader of the underground resistance trying to keep people safe from the evil new regime. And as if that wasn’t enough, it turns out that the person responsible for this evil regime is none other than a future version of Adamant himself.

The third and newest mini-series in a thematic anthology of Cronenberg/Black Mirror-style stories by creators James Tynion IV (writer) and Eryk Donovan (artist) isn’t the story of one character, or even a few. It is the story of a civilization. Eugenic is ambitious, telling individual stories at different points in time as we follow the trajectory of our civilization after genetic tampering, which was originally supposed to save us from a terrible virus. Instead, it changed us, or at least most of us. Those that were changed became hideous, purple creatures without sexual identity, race, or physical symmetry. How could they be hated when there was nothing to tell them apart. Like some deformed Picasso painting, physical beauty no longer matters. I said most changed, as the ones unaffected by the genetic alteration have become, in a way, biological slaves to the superior beings.

I have such up and down feelings for Matt Kindt and Tyler Jenkins' series, Grass Kings; some issues are wonderful, and other issues are missing a connective tissue that would otherwise pull me into the journey that the characters find themselves on.

Issue #27 of Harrow County was an emotionally harrowing endeavor. Like all the best horror stories, the things we fear the most are beginning to happen, and our hero, Emmy, has been pushed and pulled in so many directions over the course of this series that what she will do next is anyone’s guess. Talk about a cliffhanger!

Got to kick at the darkness 'till it bleeds daylight.

Spoilers from the prior issues revealed below.

After ending on a dramatic cliffhanger in issue one of Irrational Numbers: Subtraction (Wunderman Comics) in which Zalmoxis kills himself rather than persist as the negotiator of peace between Sofia and Medea, in this issue, the story picks up forty years later and, as promised, it is all-out war. Sadly, Zalmoxis’ death has been in vain, because the ladies have remained committed to pitting their vampyr armies against each other during the intervening decades leading up to the 1989 Romanian Revolution. An unknown enemy, identified as The Reaper, has not let up pursuing and reducing the numbers of vampires, regardless if they are Akousmatikoi or Mathematikoi.

Clue has been a series that should not end. Yes, the premise is such that the narrative will end because of how things are done with Clue. Yet, the storytelling and characterizations of all of the people in the story have been great. There have been no problems whatsoever with anything happening within the story. What is truly notable is exactly how Paul Allor (writer) and Nelson Daniel (artist) were able to take the story from a classic film and turn it into an amazing series that not only stays true to the original film but makes it modern, so it doesn't seem out of place for today's audiences.



Have you ever passed someone on a poorly lit street and felt unsettled, but familiar? A wash of emotion wisps by in an instant, while faint memories echo through your mind. A complete stranger, minding their own business, and suddenly you're aware of them. Personally. Perhaps in the past or in an afterlife that no longer exists you knew that person, and that person is real. You can feel it in your racing heart and the cold marrow of your bones. And you smile. That stranger was just an old colleague that you've not seen in a long while that could have been kept longer if you had only let good enough be. An old colleague whose business is you.

Page 67 of 314
Go to top