A big part of how and why Dept.H works is due to the fact that Matt Kindt knows where to place the focus for tension and suspense and when. He juggles a lot of balls all at once, which means that while story elements are being slowly revealed, our main characters are always on the edge of death due to various circumstances, decisions, or strokes of bad luck. When you’re 6 miles beneath the surface of the ocean on a lab that’s quickly crumbling with giant-sized, deadly exotic animals in the nearby waters, possible terrorists on board, and a killer or killers trying to stay alive right alongside you, you don’t get a moment to breath. Issue #18 puts our hero, Mia, and the remaining survivors in probably the most difficult position they’ve been in, and it’s nail biting.

Political power in the city of Transylvania has been concentrated in the hands of Mayor (formerly Count) Dracula and now serves the interests of only one third of Transylvania’s population. Tired of their interests taking a back seat to those of the Vampires, and aware of rising political tensions and that real oppression may be only just over the horizon, the Werewolves and Witches decide to take matters into their own hands, after a fashion: They resurrect Frankenstein (He can’t go by “monster” forever.) who, being a one-of-a-kind supernatural being, is without a natural political alignment, and so potentially a very balanced (or at least a more balanced) candidate for mayor. This is where installment #1 of Chris Allen, Jack Wallace, and Rei Lay’s Frankenstein for Mayor leaves its readers.

In issue one of Spy Seal, Malcom, a seal in full anthropomorphic mode, very much like a character straight out of a Hitchcock film, stumbled into being a secret agent for the British Government. Hello, Cary Grant! In this second issue, we find him in the midst of his first mission, and it’s both an absurd hoot and a genuine blast. Having given Malcolm the code name “001,” Rich Tommaso’s (writer, artist, colorist, letterer) reverent homages extend beyond Hitchcock into the land of James Bond. Thankfully, it never becomes full-on parody, but really does thrust Malcolm into an adventure that is still a little over his head, despite his military background. Malcolm isn’t smooth and suave, and he isn’t clever; he still has a long way to go, and that makes the journey for the reader that much more palpable.

If you’re the type of reader who prefers to wait for the trade paperback over reading issue to issue and you were longing for all four installments of Geek-Girl to become available in a single edition, your time has arrived!  As of August 25, 2017, all four chapters can be purchased in a glossy, complete volume, so the entire first arc of Ruby Kaye’s transformation into capable super hero can be yours!

Think Tank is the smartest comic book to exist, from everything I've seen. The research completed for the series alone is worth several dozen articles on the immense amount of care that Matt Hawkins puts into this series, and all of it pays off as this volume, entitled “Animal,” plays out. While judging by what has been said and the rumors that have been swirling around the book and its status, this might be the last part of Think Tank as a comic book series. If true, it's a fitting run to one of my favorite titles is the last few years.

Mad Cave Studios is a Florida-based comic book publisher which was founded in 2014 by CEO and Chief Creative Officer Mark London. As a relatively new publisher, they have focused on a handful of titles including the Battlecats series that follows a group of elite warriors known as Battlecats. The first story arc of this epic fantasy, “The Hunt for the Dire Beast,” introduces and follows the five warriors as they carry out King Eramand III’s edict to kill the Dire Beast in La Marque.

Where have you been, Turtle fans!?

When I looked up this comic online, the synopsis promised time-hopping and alternate timelines. In this first issue, at least, there is nothing like that. Still, there’s plenty to hold your interest and keep you entertained.

This is a very strange story, as Morty (also known as Evil Morty) finds himself ready and willing to do the unthinkable: take on the council of Ricks in an attempt to stop the collection and forced combat of Mortys. In doing so, Morty has put a huge target on his back, drawing the ire of the Ricks, as well as many others. This is all to say that this world is pretty messed up, and the alternate reality where Pokemon-style hijinks ensue causes some ridiculous and hilarious things to happen to poor Morty.

The Kingdom is an area of land that is both self-sufficient and self-governing. It’s run by two brothers, Bruce and Robert, who are at odds with Sheriff Humbert on the outside in Cargill. People in the Kingdom live in relative peace, but when threatened, they aren’t about to let it go without a fight. After a wily and chaotic first six issues that dove almost immediately into an all-out battle between the Kingdom and Humbert’s men, the book has taken a sharp left turn into what was merely a subplot in the first six issues, but it was the story I was waiting for.

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