Thy will be done.

The world is a bit of a mess right now.  There’s a lot of crazy out there hiding behind religious texts that align with their particular brand of hating folks or perpetrating terrible acts that may not have unanimous support of modern communities.  It’s not just one religion that people are using out there, either. There are sects of just about every major religion (and slews of minor ones) that twist doctrine to make their specific brand of awful justified.  Why do I bring this up in a comic review?  Well, Leonie O’Moore’s Lord tells just such a tale, and while its protagonist is a sympathetic character to a considered majority of the population, there are those who would brand this book as pushing an agenda rather than being a wonderfully aware British-Countryside horror (Think of the movies that Hot Fuzz was based on.) that feels like it could be just as relevant in today’s world as the time period that it’s based in.

Before we really get started on this review, I need to mention something, and this goes for series creators Keiron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie. You two are really making it tough to do my job here, because what is there to say about a book that has been consistently excellent for over two years? With the fourth part of the “Imperial Phase” arc underway, the team of Gillen and McKelvie have brought things to a new level as the myth of The Great Darkness, a long-thought lie of Ananke, proves to not be so untrue, doing the very little thing of attacking members of the Pantheon.

Being a superhero or supervillian is tough. Being a process server who serves them is even tougher. Just ask brothers Clive and Cheech and their rag-tag team in Serving Supes.

The comic series, Hex11, has had quite an adventure since its inception back in 2014. The series’ first six issues saw a release in a trade paperback collection after a successful Kickstarter campaign and was nominated for the Dwayne McDuffie Award for Diversity. The series is about to see the release of their ninth issue sometime in February, spearheaded by artist Lisa K. Weber, writer Kelly Sue Milano, and producer Lynly Forrest.

The list of well-known backers supporting the Kickstarter campaign for Myopia in August 2015 is astounding to see. The expectation for the final product’s success, for those that pledged to the campaign, exponentially increases with signed rewards from Neil Gaiman, Margaret Atwood, Dean Koontz, and George R. R. Martin, to name a few.

The world is being told that "they" are dangerous. This group is feared, and one person is leading this charge to rid humanity of these unworldly beings. These spiritual entities are stuck in this realm and “the media calls them ‘Spectrals.’ To the rest of the world, they are rotting corpses, best left to die.” These different looking creatures must find a means to survive, but everyone else hates them - except those that have a need for mercenary work, or in other cases, a “backstreet dentist.” Even though they file their grievances similarly to others, in a bar having drinks with friends, they understand their place in the world as being alone, and they find solace in identifying themselves as a member of the group, “Cadavers.”

Ruby finally seems to be settling into her superheroine status at the beginning of Geek-Girl #3, and she’s genuinely enjoying beating up baddies and throwing out witty quips.  Thanks to the waitress (Mariella) she rescued in issue #1, Ruby’s figuring out that her fair-weather friends aren’t worth fretting over as well, and I hope that the two ladies form a healthy friendship as Ruby/Geek-Girl helps Mariella with her ex-boyfriend.  The androids from Geek-Girl #2 aren’t exactly what they seem, and some new characters show up to add more depth to Ruby’s already bizarre world.  What will it all mean, and how do they fit in with Lightning Storm?

The Black Monday Murders is not only intriguing, it’s downright riveting. It’s what going after Wall Street might look like if handled by Stanley Kubrick or Alan Moore. It’s rife with archaic symbols, occult-like gatherings, and bizarre, ritualistic murders. When dealing with Jonathan Hickman as the writer, something with an esoteric flare is to be expected. Even with his runs on Marvel’s Avengers, well-known commodities became parts of the Illuminati and Futurists, and as unwieldy as the Secret Wars crossover became for Marvel to handle, at its core was a delightful story about politics and the abuse of power and a dictator recreating a world in his own image (something that’s very timely right now.) Wall Street is also very relevant, and Hickman shows no love for them, but those are twists and turns have no desire to simply tell you about.

A few months ago, I called a bet on how long IDW Publishing’s ongoing Back to the Future series would allow its current storyline, “Who is Marty McFly,” to last.  So far, we’re on Part 4…

If you were asked twenty years ago, “Who are some of your favorite comic book characters?” – what would your answer have been? If you’re asked that question now, how can the response not include Daisy, Esther, and Susan? This power trio from Giant Days are completely unique on their own and blend together to create a wonderful mix of stories continuing their run as part of BOOM! Box, an imprint of BOOM! Studios.

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