The finale to Rick Remender and Jerome Opeña’s celebrated series, Seven to Eternity, is finally here. Adam’s quest for redemption and salvation from the Mud King comes to a conclusion, and it’s one fit for a king.

Previously on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Faith and Wesley seemed to be wrapped up in some major plans that Major Wilkins and Giles’ Mom have cooking up for the future. Meanwhile, the Scoobies are running out of time and space as the consequences of their interdimensional jaunt seem to be catching up on them.

Yin and yang. Strong vs. weak. Guts vs. cowardice. In Dark Horse Comics' new series, Lucky Devil, an immortal being possesses someone who is their complete opposite, and then loses their power to them. The results are unexpected.

I’ve been following Mike Mignola and Christopher Golden’s expanded Outerverse series with interest and curiosity. Where is all of this going? I wonder. A slew of new characters are being introduced, some known characters are being brought back, and all of the stories tend to follow a certain map: Ur-witches show up and cause mischief and our heroes bat them away. Even more than Hellboy, this feels like an ongoing serial which makes sense since most of it takes place during WWII. Even the title feels like a 1940s/50s serial.

“What in God’s name is that smell?”
“It takes a greater mind than mine to put a name to what it is.
I’m told he calls it his Peace Ray.
The smell can’t be helped.  The device scorches the air.
Also, I’d imagine there may be minute articles of sheep in it…”


Sleep is rooted with disorders known as parasomnias. Nightmares, sleepwalking, talking, physically attacking a bedpartner, night terrors… these and more fall under that category, making sleep the perfect vehicle for a disconcerting and thrilling comic. But, with Cullen Bunn at the helm, you never know where that comic might take you. For Parasomnia, a three-issue series from Dark Horse, he’s teamed up with Andrea Mutti to bring readers the ultimate split-world mystery.

BRZRKR has been really interesting. Created by Keanu Reeves and written by both Reeves and Matt Kindt (who is one of my favorite comic book writers), they are telling the story of someone who cannot die and has for the extent of his life (70,000 years or so) been a weapon used for violence. Now, he wants to die, and modern medicine is trying to help him in exchange for . . . ya know . . . creating a super army based on him. Like modern military medicine does.

The creators of this series realize that they can’t go to the same trough every time. So, when they hit a certain sequence - an absolutely vital sequence not only in the story, but in Erica’s development as a child when inducted into the Order of St George - they had to make it feel different. Um . . . holy crap, did they make the right decision.

Quick recap: On Earth That Was, after a tense showdown between the Serenity crew and the plunderers, an unlikely alliance was formed between the crew and the Earthers. The question remains: Is this an actual peace treaty or just a temporary truce while they stand against a common enemy?

We last left Andy, Effy, and the survivors of the attack on Sampson fleeing the planet; however, the villagers who fought against the vampires had a secret of their own: They were robots designed to look humanoid and be able to hide in plain sight. This was a huge surprise to many, causing some serious morale problems. Back on the mining colony of Dirishu-6, Tim and Driller the Killer team up to face off with Mother’s sister.

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