Rockstars is a brand new comic book series from Image Comics, created by writer Joe Harris (The X-Files; Millennium) and artist Megan Hutchison (An Aurora Grimeon Story: Will O’ the Wisp). Harris and Hutchison are joined by Kelly Fitzpatrick (colors), Michael David Thomas (letters), Tom Muller (designer), and Shawna Gore (editor), and the first issue will premiere this Wednesday at local comic book retailers. The cover collage of issue one is vivid and unique; it is a semiotician’s nirvana of symbols, signifiers, and signs, representing the always suspected occultism that fuels the image of rockstars with long hair, playing loud boisterous guitars that scream at a fever pitch and set women’s hearts afire. 

Well that's another fine mess you've gotten us into.

When you live with a group of “magical humanoid aliens,” it’s necessary to teach them some of the basics about life on Earth…like setting up tents, making s'mores, and telling scary stories around the campfire.  In the recently released Steven Universe and the Crystal Gems trade paperback from KaBoom!, Steven sets out to introduce Garnet, Amethyst, and Pearl to the joys of outdoor vacationing and ends up getting more than he bargained for on the scary story front.

Tall tales and tall deeds.

When I was a kid, I loved the Jim Henson's Storyteller series.  I didn’t quite know what it was. I only caught a few episodes, and it never quite entered my consciousness as to who Jim Henson was, though I loved watching The Muppet Show on summer mornings after Gomer Pyle and F Troop. (I have since continued my eclectic taste for programing from multiple decades, but that’s a tale for another time.)  The Storyteller was pitched a little above my age group, but it was one of those shows that stayed with me, resonating without me realizing why.  When I came back upon it on DVD eight years ago, I was enraptured.  It was somehow nostalgic and yet completely new, as I had not seen the majority of the episodes.  The series found the magic of myth and storytelling in a perfect mix that managed to invoke something primal in my consciousness, a forgotten time where stories were told over many days by an elder around a fire, when stories were something more than just an entertainment. They had a life all their own.

John Allison does it again. He instantly grabs the reader’s attention in Giant Days #21 with smart, funny dialogue between his dynamic trio - Daisy, Esther, and Susan. These women are not only witty, but completely relatable when you take into consideration their idiosyncrasies that make them fantastic to follow page after page.

There are a few questions fans ask about Star Trek repeatedly. “Who’s the best captain?” “Why do some Klingons look like Eurasian stereotypes and others have a ton of ridges on their foreheads?” “Why would you ever build a holodeck that could, in theory, kill someone?” These questions are timeless. “What would Captain Kirk’s Iron Man cosplay look like?” is not one of these questions for most people, but if you are one of the happy few, New Visions has you covered.

The “Imperial Phase” is in full swing, as the second issue of the newest Wic/Div arc arrives. Self-described by writer Keiron Gillen as “the self-indulgence phase” of their musically adjacent series, this arc sees our lovely lead Persephone emerging as the driving force of the book once again. In her previous form as fangirl Laura, she was the audience's way into the complex and otherworldly lives of the resurrected Gods. Now, as one, she doesn't give us that same glimpse into the world, but we know the world a bit better by now, and her presence as the aggressive and fearless rebel of the New Gods is beginning to complicate things. The hedonism of the Gods knows no bounds, but their experiences come from years of knowing what they're doing, and whom, and why. With Persephone being more of a baby God, her actions are already beginning to get on the nerves of some of the Gods, especially since most of her action revolve around sleeping with people, despite her ongoing relationship with Baal.

“The point is, I wasn’t special.  I was a no one.
But it’s all my fault.
This place in the mountains.
The way things are.
All of it.
Because I stole the wrong thing.”

What if you were being chased by skeletal ghosts? What if they were reaching for you and some of them had weapons, without any intention other than to take your life? What if you were severely wounded - grabbing at your wound, bleeding, and grimacing in pain? And what if your slow path forward, away from these menacing ghosts, was somewhat blocked by a yellow feline that looks mortified as blood drips down onto it?

Titan Comics hurls its fans into the life of Frank Braffort as he and those in his French military unit fight for their lives. Writer Serge Lehman, winner of the Prix Rosny-Aine for Best Novel (F.A.U.S.T.) and Best Short Fiction (Dans I’abime and Origami), has his work translated to English for Titan Comics. The three-time winner of the annual French science fiction award presents an intriguing tale seemingly simple at first glance of the first few pages, and then quickly makes the reader realize that Masked is futuristic and filled with science fiction goodness.

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