Inspector Oh #1 ended with Ziyi valiantly trying to return her uncle to life with a magical pearl.  The latest issue proves our fierce heroine succeeded, but Oh . . . well, isn’t quite back to his old self. (He initially confuses Ziyi with his nephew, Ging Han – of course, that’s pretty classic for the crazy exorcist.)  Before their reunion can be complete, the pair has to escape from Hell and return to the land of the living, but without Oh’s powers, it could be a complicated task!

What would happen if the legend of King Arthur were propelled into the twenty-first century? Arthur would be a woman, of course. Dark Horse’s five-part series, The Once and Future Queen, brings us the exciting adventures of Rani Arturus, a 19-year-old chess whiz who pulls the sword from the stone. Chess is a fitting activity for a modern-day King Arthur, because it highlights Rani’s strategic skills and foresightedness. I expect Rani will have prowess and a cunning ability to be one step ahead of any enemy she faces in this series.

Fighting the Alliance and its operatives has never been a pleasant or easy task for Mal Reynolds, but then again, Mal has never been one to turn away from a challenge because it won’t be easy or pleasant. The captain of the Serenity and its crew continue this behavioral trend in this month’s Serenity: No Power in the ‘Verse #5, written by Chris Roberson and featuring the art of Georges Jeanty. While Mal and his crew make a move to reacquire the abducted members of their group, the captain goes toe to toe with another Alliance operative, determined to defend his family to end.

If you’re looking for a light, fluffy graphic novel about rainbows, unicorns, and a world full of magical happiness, do not pick up Dark Matter II. If you want something that functions as pure mind candy (No judgment; we all need mind candy!), do not try reading Dark Matter II; however, if you’re in the mood for a graphic novel anthology of pessimistic and thought-provoking stories about the less savory sides of humanity, this book is definitely what you need.

Writer Zack Kaplan discusses “being hopeful in dark times” in a letter to fans, which can be seen in the trade paperback, Eclipse: Volume One. The theme of hope in this story does not get lost in translation, especially since Kaplan has created a world where life must be preciously captured in the darkness.

An idea is like a virus.

This was the opening of Inception, and it’s fairly recognized throughout our social spheres today, with a video or work “going viral” being the best potential hope for any creator.  Within this anthology series we get idea seeds from several different and wildly varied creators. We also get some ideas based very much in the abstract, and some who turn those abstracts into something logical and grounded.  The act of creation is often a violent one, with infinite possibilities being whittled down until the story exists as a whole. Once your lead turns into a hero, the choices become “stay a hero” or “become a villain,” and either choice kills the potential of the other side.  This is something the Big Two try to avoid at all costs with many technological, magical, and simply oddball MacGuffins that allow Cap to be Hydra or a whole half of the galaxy to die and it gets wiped clean like an etch-a-sketch.  This isn’t the violent storytelling that often brings out the best kinds of anguish when something ends, but what we have here are four-page arcs that have a small space to squeeze the entire possibility of creation into. There are some bold and ambitious voices doing it.

Hey, Turtles fans!  Long time, no read!  I feel like it was just last week that I was writing about our favorite heroes-in-a-half-shell.  Oh wait…because I was!

My fellow time travelers, I can’t believe that today was the first time I set foot in my local comic book shop all year!  I was so behind in purchasing my latest comics for my ever-growing collection that I’ve especially missed my Back to the Future stories. 

The Life and Death cycle by Dan Abnett has had some really good issues and some very mediocre ones. I feel like the story he had in place wasn’t quite bulky enough for such a long run, and so issues have passed to move some of our intrepid colonial marines from one place to the other in preparation for a better issue. I felt this especially about some of the Prometheus issues and the previous issue of Aliens vs. Predator. But as we near the final issue, Abnett has no other choice but to tighten the noose, and so we have issue three.

For a hundred years, a stone has restored a world from darkness and into the light. A land of misery has been transformed to a place of healing and worship. The struggle to survive against wicked creatures looking to steal your soul evaporated once two heroes placed a broken shard back into the crystal, making it whole again. Life became a “happily ever after” wonder, and never would such heartache return to this world. Or would it?

Page 44 of 92
Go to top