In the grim darkness of the far future, there is only war.  Such are the words printed on nearly every game book in the Warhammer 40,000 (or Warhammer 40k or even just 40k) series.  Created by British company Games Workshop in 1987, this miniatures game set in a dystopian 41st millennium, where humanity must defend itself from alien threats and heresy within, has attracted players from all over and continues to go strong to this day.  The deep, intricate background of the galaxy and its inhabitants, as well as the numerous customizable armies, give everyone something to latch onto.  How does this translate into their first foray into comics?  Well… I find it lacking, to say the least.

“Times Square, 1986: the home of New York’s red light district, where strip clubs, porno theatres, and petty crime prevail.

When a chance encounter for Peepbooth worker Roxy Bell leads to the brutal murder of a public access pornographer, the erotic performer and her punk rock ex-partner Nick Zero soon find themselves under fire from criminals, cops, and the city elite, as they begin to untangle a complex web of corruption leading right to City Hall.

Like the Naked City, there are eight million stories in the Deuce.  This is one of them…”

If you ever believe that toxic black mold is dangerous or in the least presents some kind of potential health problems, then the new series premiere, Rivers of London by Titan Comics, introduces a completely new form of holy moldy.

You will fall into darkness. You will witness monsters harnessing powers to deprive others of their inner light. Life will become a spectator sport and the choice to do much of anything else will be almost nonexistent.

You seem familiar to me…

Titan’s blurb promoting their new series, The Chimera Brigade, seemed to imply a new super-verse for readers that would be set in World War II.  I thought that this was going to be something new, with the powered individuals receiving their gifts by way of chemical and radiological weapons from the trenches of The Great War.  Upon meeting this new group, however, it seems that things are going to more closely clone the Big Two than I had reasonably expected.  At first I was taken aback by it, especially with how far artist Gess went to make sure that we knew the inspiration behind each superhuman (which I’ll get into in a second).  It seems, instead, that this book will be focused more on the daughter of Madame Curie who seems slated to be a witness to history rather than its author as her mother was.

Has anyone else been reading TMNT Universe?  It’s really good, you guys!  The gods of comic books—a.k.a. Kevin Eastman, Bobby Curnow, and Tom Waltz—have created another hopefully ongoing series, and I’m curious to know if we’ll only see some characters in one series and the rest in the other.  But only time will tell… 

The Strain, the first in a trilogy of vampire wonder, has generated a continuous stream of content since its release in 2009. The originators of this tale, Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan, have seen their story adapted to many different platforms.

Bandette does not disappoint. It is phenomenal, “no?” This rhetorically wit-laden genius of a character proves that Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover can make storytelling and artwork seem easily accomplished. Bandette is the best thief in the world, and the simple fact she narrates her own action sequences shows the reader how endearing she is from the beginning.

I hesitate to say that Sherlock Holmes, the famously brilliant and proficient detective created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, has ever fallen out of popularity, but we are certainly living in a time of heightened interest in Holmes when it comes to the pop culture scene. Between television programs like the BBC’s Sherlock and CBS’ Elementary, feature films like Guy Ritchie’s Sherlock Holmes (and its sequels), and graphic novels like Image Comics’ Moriarty, there’s no drought of exciting content to devour for fans of the world-famous detective and his various capers. Now, I, Holmes (written by Michael Lent and illustrated by Dan Parsons) can be added to the list of comic book options for Sherlock fans searching for their next fix, offering a modern-day, gender-swapped version of the detective from 221B Baker Street.

Crack open The Secret Loves of Geek Girls, and you will find comic strips, essays, memories, observations, self-help tutorials, and, most of all, very personal confessions.  In short, Secret Loves is a massive collection of individual voices of the geek and the girl varieties.  Every story has one thing in common, though…raw and honest accounts of geeks searching to understand themselves and their connections with others.

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