Issue #2 of Steve Orlando and Garry Brown’s Crude takes a sharp right turn, and it’s hard for me to say whether it’s going to all fit together or not just yet.

Paranoia is the main dish in Jeff Lemire (writer) and Andrea Sorrentino’s (artist) Gideon Falls, a story that weaves in and out of themes of madness, faith, and the supernatural. A sort of Twin Peaks meets…I’ve been digging around for a second example, because there is something in the way this book is approached and constructed that doesn’t quite feel like this or that. I could say Jacob’s Ladder or Hellraiser by way of Andrei Tarkovsky. There’s a gritty, dreamlike quality to this book, an effective, surreal, nightmarish atmosphere that Sorrentino creates with Dave Stewart (colors).

This book is hard to describe. While the general premise (Gods return for 2 year, then die, only to be reborn again.) isn't so tough to explain, when issues like this one come along, where reading it becomes a tale of two halves, it complicates things a bit, especially as the true narrative of the book begins to unravel, with the Great Darkness approaching and everything flying full steam into the endgame.

You don’t read I Am a Hero, the zombie epic by Kengo Hanazawa, you full on experience it. From the first book, I knew it would be special. I knew I had to read every volume as it came out, but I would have never been able to tell you that this is where we would be after reading the final pages of Omnibus 6. This series continuously undercuts expectations and presents to you a reality unexpected. It’s a constant mind-f***, an emotional battering ram, an exhilarating lightning rod of a read in which you experience this absurd, outrageous, and terrifying world along with this oddball assortment of survivors. It’s exactly how you would expect a zombie apocalypse to break the rules of everything you knew to be true. Here, the zombies (known as ZQNs) are transfixed with repeating their day-to-day life. Why? How? Omnibus 6 toys with some answers while presenting a sort of hierarchy of ZQNs that could spell the demise of the remaining survivors.

Wednesday is back! And, no surprise, he’s been concocting some battle plans. It’s refreshing to have his magic and superior knowledge of things back, as well. I love the sequence when he explains to Shadow all of the charms that he knows. These panels show the extent of his power—which seems to be rather far-reaching. Wednesday has powers that affect both humans and other magical beings, and many of his powers can protect people, which does not seem in line with his character. I had always viewed Wednesday as being more self-serving, but his true agenda continues to be a mystery. Perhaps there is a more philanthropic motivation—either that or he just has the ability to help people but may not often choose to exercise these powers.

When you set out on a path of revenge, best dig two graves.

It's a little tough to give a proper review of Walt Disney’s Treasury of Classic Tales Volume 3. It isn't your average omnibus or anthology collection. Long before Marvel and Disney tied the knot, Disney had a line of comics in morning newspapers. Based on various properties ranging from iconic Mickey Mouse stories to adaptations of films like Big Red, Disney comics are an old and varied lot. As a fan of older Disney properties, I picked up Walt Disney’s Treasury of Classic Tales Volume 3 with a lot of excitement.

There is an urban legend known as The Unsound. This has nothing to do with that.

Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin ,along with Muntsa Vicente, flip the form of the comic book format on its side. Literally. To give us a more cinematic perspective of the story as it unfolds, they’ve altered the typical “portrait” format by rotating the view 45 degrees clockwise to a “landscape” format, creating a 70mm texture which is fitting for this mixture of genres. The first time I saw this done in a comic was an issue of Todd McFarlane’s Spider-Man back in the '90s. I always thought it was cool, but it didn’t serve a purpose or wasn’t used to pronounce the story in any meaningful way. Here, it does.

Angelic is a freaking beautiful and soulful comic about flying monkeys. How can that even be?

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