“Love Town is a city built upon a foundation of corruption, violence, and greed, where millionaire celebrities rub shoulders with ruthless gangsters and scheming politicians, where the figurative magic of the silver screen competes with the literal magic of the streets.

Magic is the siren’s song that lures so many in Love Town to their doom…”

Last month, we closed out the first arc of BOOM! Studios’ relaunch of the Firefly series with a serious cliffhanger. Instead of steering us straight into some new, intergalactic shenanigans this month, BOOM! is launching its Firefly: Bad Company line, and its first issue focuses on our dear Mrs. Reynolds, “Saffron.” The issue explores Saffron’s mysterious past, and coming in at 40 whole pages, it feels pretty well paced and organic in its storytelling.

No. No, no, no, no. Matt Kindt and Tyler Jenkins just dropped a bomb of an issue, and now I have to wait an entire month to see what happens next.

Hit-Girl's plan to bring murder and mayhem to the city of angels hits an unexpected obstacle in part two of The Golden Rage of Hollywood. Writer Kevin Smith and artist Pernille Ørum follow up their ultra violent first issue with a more emotionally impactful installment that sets the stage for a bigger bloodbath still to come.

Old grudges and new revelations push washed-up artist Hal Crane over the edge in the heated conclusion to the two-part Bad Weekend storyline. In Criminal #3, noir masters Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips complete their journey through the dark underbelly of the comic book creators community.

Polar: The Kaiser Falls is a flat-out masterpiece of a graphic novel.  It is gritty, compelling, unapologetically beautiful visual storytelling and features the best of everything this medium has to offer.

It’s been a while since an entirely new series had me this intrigued and hyped. Invisible Kingdom #1 gave me whiffs of Firefly, Dune, Avatar, and Saga, and yet presented a story that was unique in both its tone and visual style. The first issue does an amazing job of setting the scene, presenting some of the themes that the series seems set to tackle (consumerism, class/race dynamics, and self-determinism vs. destiny), and introducing us to a rather diverse cast of characters with possibly conflicting or converging interests and agendas.

Every action has a purpose, and every victory a price.

Remember when you were the loser in high school for not playing D&D? All the most popular and sexually active teens were doing it? Rollin' d20s like it ain't no thang. They like to hit that with multiple crit. Naw, I'm sayin' my DMs? Remember?

Rick and Morty is a strange franchise, known for being outlandish, kind of gross, and just a bizarre mix of science, humor, and some truly outrageous visuals. The comics for the franchise have been no different, keeping the same sense of personality and ridiculousness that the show is known for, without the tricky animation budgets and writing delays.

Page 5 of 306
Go to top