What if your feline had a weekly column to answer a question? How do you think your cat would answer? Written and illustrated by Charles Brubaker, Ask a Cat (2017, Smallbug Press) was sparked by the “ask a character” format. In his introduction, Brubaker explains that although he was working on a comic featuring a witch at the time, he arbitrarily decided to use a cat to answer questions he solicited on a message board. He debuted Ask a Cat on his tumblr account in December 2014, and in 2015, Brubaker bundled the comic strips he had drawn into a mini book to sell at convention. From his initial thought of just drawing a few comic strips, suddenly, his quirky comic strip had a future on GoComics! Now, two years later, a new Ask a Cat strip appears each Sunday, and it has become his main project. 

Yowza village is a place governed by patriarchal principles, so much so that when a daughter is born to the village guardian, Tane, the village doctor and nurse conspire to switch out the guardian’s natural-born daughter with the only other baby born on the same day - the shopkeeper’s son.

Fighting American #1 is an exciting start to a very colorful series that brings us back to "simpler times" and then places us right in the forefront of the future. It's quite fascinating to look at just what we are getting with this series. Writer Gordon Rennie and artist Duke Mighten join forces to not only place us in the center of an amazing series but give us a great introduction to all the different characters. This series will likely become larger than life with time.

The Evil Within fans are having a great year. First, it was announced that we’ll finally see a second title in the ever-popular video game series. Then, they received an intermediary gift in the form of a two-issue comic book series to bridge the gap between games #1 and #2. As a follow-up to the first issue, The Evil Within: The Interlude #2 (Titan Comics) satisfies the fan in every possible way and prepares them for their return to STEM.

American Gods: Shadows #8 continues to encourage us to think about American land and the land’s relationship with people. By providing some history of settlement in America, the series asks how our history contributes to how we identify as American today. And then, of course, there’s the mythos factor that shapes the American identity, as well.

When characters die in a story, it’s not always clear what the resulting impact will be from the person’s absence. In Lifeformed: Cleo Makes Contact, it’s made clear that the main character will be dealing with an alien invasion “and her father’s death.” Dark Horse Books tells you up front in the synopsis, but it’s not enough. It still doesn’t prepare the reader for the shock that comes within those pages, and that translates to the story being told by writer Matt Mair Lowery and artist Cassie Anderson.

How can such a small thing take so much away?

The War for the Planet of the Apes series has been an example with each issue of how a comic book should be written and drawn. While the comic certainly ties into the feature film that was released this summer, it stands on its own in many ways and in some ways surpasses the film series. Writer David Walker has a great command over Caesar and also the narrative as a whole. He portrays Caesar as a complex and multifaceted character that is as interesting to read about as any other character in the series; however, Jonas Scharf really brings the series to the next level with his artwork.

Over the last few years, creators James Tynion IV and Eryk Donovan have been delving into some Cronenberg-esque areas of horror with their series of comics that I’ll call the “-ic” series. Memetic and Cognetic were the first two series that delved into the downfall of the human race in equally terrifying ways. They were both strange and effective creations that I loved. Now, Eugenic, while still holding true to the terrifying horror elements of the previous books, is just as much about the rebirth of the human race as it is the destruction of it.

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