It’s been way too long since the last issue of Future Proof. Issue #11 involved the mysterious figure from previous issues (apparently called “Umbrella Man”) stepping out of the shadows and organizing a crew of time-traveling supervillains that included Jim Morrison and Amelia Earhart. So, you can see why I’ve been anxious to see how the story continues. Rest assured that this issue does not disappoint.

And so, too, must all things end, and what then?

Have you had that moment when a story finishes, regardless of the medium, and you find yourself disoriented?  Like you’re caught between the place you were in the tale and the world in which you pay your taxes and do your grocery shopping?  You take a deep breath, your focus having been so completely in that other place that you scarcely breathed, and whatever compelling part of the story that drew you so far in lingers awhile, overlaying your reality like an AR game.  This is the feeling that some of the greatest stories I’ve read have left me with, and every one of them lingers into the “waking world” (for lack of a better term), because the truth that lays at the heart of them was powerful.  Rick Remender has assembled just this sort of tale from top to bottom, and the finale is wonderfully executed.  There's a breath after the last page where you'll need that moment to remove yourself from that world, and the cautionary tale within will stick with me for a really long time.

Hello, faithful readers!  WAY back a year or so ago, I read and reviewed a comic called Blood and Gourds.  It was this crazy mish-mosh of greedy corporate fat cats doing bad things with hill-billies, hot farmers’ daughters, and tourists all mixing it up with angry, hell-ish… produce.

There is no spoon, but there's lots of ice cream.

In The Matrix, Keanu Reaves went on a quest of self-discovery that was laden with import, high tension, and the fate of the damn world hanging in the balance.  Hard Wyred is a lot like that, but with much more "I know Kung Fu" and less "I would know the One because I'd love him."  It's what would have happened if James Gunn had directed The Matrix instead of the Wachowskis.  Don't get me wrong, that film is a classic and a paragon of the form, but it's fun to watch these guys turn the basics and go sideways with it.

Margaret Atwood takes to comics, and, while at times charming, her Angel Catbird graphic novel lacks commitment to the absurdity of her idea and the logic within the story.

God save ‘er.

Jamie Me has begun a story that feels apropos of today’s political climate: a woman is offered the chance to cut through the nonsense of bureaucracy to do some good on behalf of those whose voices (we assume) have been muted by the system.  With the recent election nightmares here in the States, it’s a scary glimpse into the anger that pundits believe is underlying the electorate at the moment, and the moral quandaries that accompany it.

A little over two years ago, I began writing for Fanbase Press.  At the time, we were still called Fanboy Comics, but here I am, 96 reviews (This marks my 97th.) and 11 editorials later, and I couldn’t be prouder of both myself and the entire Fanbase team. 

One of the most interesting series out there has added another issue to their story with the release of Cryptocracy #3. The story of the nine families that secretly rule the world has been a unique experience to read thus far,  especially given that it’s taken on a completely different plot than I expected.

Dark Horse Comics makes damn good comics based on the Aliens franchise, and they’ve been doing it for some time now (all they way since 1988). Their newest miniseries, Aliens: Life and Death, by writer Dan Abnett and artist Moritat does nothing to change this trend of excellence and brings all the required elements to the table in order to attract fans: bullets, beasties, badasses, and blood... a whole lot of blood...

What would you do if you discovered you couldn’t die? What would you do if you couldn’t die, but had nothing left to live for? What would you do if you couldn’t die, but could still get hurt really, really badly?

Page 38 of 47
Go to top